There is great comfort in lies

I’ve been listening to a podcast off and on from the School Sucks Project about conspiracy theories. Parts of it do not set well with me. For instance, one speaker claims that those of us who have an alternative (and more realistic) view of the world, but are unable to communicate it with others, ought to give it up and merely join the “real” world.

After all, what is the point of knowing things but being unable to communicate them? Cassandra had the ability to foresee the future, but was cursed by Apollo so that no one would ever believe her. My group has the ability to see the past clearly, but we are unable to communicate it to the general public.

I find joining the “real” world untenable because the fault does not lie with me. We live in a highly effective totalitarian society under strict thought control. The ability to break free of thought control  is a rare trait, and a remarkable achievement. To simply set that achievement aside and succumb is as desolate and depressing as the end of Orwell’s 1984. Truth is worthy in its own right. I cannot help those who cannot or will not look for it.

Another part of the podcast is a thought experiment. Assume you were handed a suitcase, and with it an ironclad guarantee that inside were documents that spelled out the truth of JFK, moon landings, 9/11, Boston and untold other events that were contrived.

What would you do?

I would open it up and dive in. I love that sort of thing. But the speakers in the podcast assert that most people would not only not open the suitcase, but would destroy it. There is great comfort in lies.

School Sucks Project, Conspira-thon (The Prequel) Conclusion – No Planes?

About Mark Tokarski

Just a man who likes to read, argue, and occasionally be surprised.
This entry was posted in Thought control. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to There is great comfort in lies

  1. Luckyman says:

    “The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counter intuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what is true.” Carl Sagan

    Liked by 1 person

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