Wild Bill and the Dead Man’s Hand

This topic has been in my In box for a while but since Miles’ guest writers/singers were way out west recently, I thought I’d add to the pile now.

When I was looking into Truman Capote and his fictional murders, I took a side trip to get a glance at James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok. One of Capote’s characters was named Hickock and I wondered if there might be a connecting clue to Wild Bill. I couldn’t find any though there was a hint through some tangential Rodeo promoters in the 30’s, but there wasn’t enough to continue that digression.

Later, to streamline that look into Hickok, I decided to list a few basic questions that could be applied to any historical person of interest to determine if they were whom the MSM says they were. These questions by now are familiar, but I am attempting to sift through several people of the 19th century, especially here in the good old U S of A, to get a better grip on, for example, our “special relationship” to Britain and the crown and the methods used by spooks major and minor to keep that relationship intact. Continue reading “Wild Bill and the Dead Man’s Hand”

Barbara Walters … that damned widow’s peak

The matter of Pamela Courson and Barbara Walters has been festering within me, and I think I might finally be able to resolve it here … to a degree. The idea that triggered the solution was something I noticed back when I first dove in, that Barbara Walters has a slight widow’s peak.

Continue reading “Barbara Walters … that damned widow’s peak”

Did Everett Ruess fake his death?

Note to readers – I received this very interesting submission by frequent commenter Kerry, and am happy to publish it for him.

Did Everett Ruess fake his death?

By: Kerry Anderson

RuessFor readers unfamiliar with the story, Everett Ruess was a 20 year old artist who vanished near the Grand Canyon in November of 1934. At least 2 search parties covered many square miles of rugged terrain. These were experienced locals and Navajo trackers. All that was found was an old campfire, the word “NEMO” (one of his monikers) carved into the sandstone, and his 2 burros, Cockleburrs and Clocolatero, along with their halters. None of his camp equipment, art supplies, or other possessions were ever located.

Continue reading “Did Everett Ruess fake his death?”

Killing Cats for Sport and Profit

On January 11, 2018, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) released its “scientific review” of the Canada lynx in the contiguous U.S., which concluded that the species “may no longer warrant protection” under the ESA (Endangered Species Act of 1973).

An estimated 2,000 Canada lynx remain in the wild, its range extends from Maine, to northeastern Minnesota, and westward to western Montana, northeastern Idaho, north-central Washington and western Colorado. Lynx are a long-legged cousin of the bobcat – with tufted ears. Lynx can grow almost 36 inches long and weigh up to 30 pounds. These reclusive, snow-loving cats prefer dense forest habitat and feed primarily on the snowshoe hare, but will take pine squirrels when times are tough.

According to the Fish and Wildlife Service’s own scientist, Megan Kosterman, 50% of each lynx home range must be mature, dense forest to provide optimal habitat for lynx to breed and raise kittens, and no more than 15 percent of each lynx home range should be clearcut. Not a single National Forest is complying with this ecological recommendation – a system failure devastating to population trajectories.  FWS refuses to address this issue. Continue reading “Killing Cats for Sport and Profit”

Cold Blood and Weak Tea

TCM was promoting the 1967 Richard Brooks film, In Cold Blood, last week and it got me to thinking, given the Zal Rule* at Fakeopedia, that the killing of the Clutter family in 1959, the basis for Truman Capote’s book of the same name and subject, would likely be a hoax.

*Zal Rule: If there is a major motion picture of a “real” event, you can be certain the event is a hoax- 

Continue reading “Cold Blood and Weak Tea”