The odd ones

There are things we are told which are plainly obviously lies, such as magic bullets and aircraft slicing through steel buildings like a knife through butter, all utterly impossible, defying logic and physics. Yet dogged doctrinaire supporters of power demand that we pretend to believe these things to be real and undeniably true. This is the source of our cognitive dissonance, power over our perceptions, to tell us that we see one thing that is actually something else. Those of us who do not see what power tells us to see are indeed the odd ones.

I wrote that, and it is bad form to quote myself. But it does, more or less, add yellow highlighter to the center of my existence. And I’ve been kicking it around for a couple of days here as I avoid writing on the blog. If I cannot get one true thing across, what is the point?

There are degrees of acceptance of the above. For me it is easy. I simply say that if something cannot be true, then it is not true. On the far side, the other end, people like James Conner, for instance, ridicule what is obviously true as a belief in impossible conspiracy, as if saying things that are obviously true is stupid! Most people fall somewhere in between, troubled, wanting to belong to the mainstream and so filing away their doubts in a dark place. That is the definition of cognitive dissonance.

What Conner does is a manifestation of denial, of aggressive stupidity, and yet I know he is not stupid. If the dissonance resides so uncomfortably in him that he feels a need to lash out, then he is perhaps on the verge of internal harmony. Perhaps he will come around. Perhaps his isolation right now is a time during which he is confronting his own internal contradictions.

Perhaps not. His writing lately offers no hint of any forward movement.

In the meantime, there is politics. We always have politics. It does us no good; it solves no problems. It merely keeps us busy. The political system is too corrupt for mere intermittent unfocused anxiety expressed as well-intended votes to have any impact on the power behind the candidates. Perhaps, if one can admit that certain physical feats are impossible, then a clean accounting of the soul will yield yet another hard and undeniable truth: We do not live in a democracy, a republic, a democratic republic, or anything even remotely representing that kind of place. There is only one way that public opinion matters in this country, and that is when it is unified against power.

Unless some entertainer suggests on TV that we should do that, I don’t see that happening anytime soon.

About Mark Tokarski

Just a man who likes to read, argue, and occasionally be surprised.
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6 Responses to The odd ones

  1. steve kelly says:

    “In the eyes of posterity it will inevitably seem that, in safeguarding our freedom, we destroyed it. The vast clandestine apparatus we built up to prove our enemies’ resources and intentions only served in the end to confuse our own purposes; that practice of deceiving others for the good of the state led infallibly to our deceiving ourselves; and that vast army of clandestine personnel built up to execute these purposes were soon caught up in the web of their own sick fantasies, with disastrous consequences for them and us.”

    — Malcom Muggeridge, May 1966 http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v09/v09p305_Marchetti.html

    Interesting “old school” accounts of Vietnam-era manufactured unreality, however obsolete today, may hold value in understanding what’s going on today. Some may find this to be beyond the rules of acceptable human behavior and should be classifies as improper reading material. You be the judge.

    The information is provided above is intended solely for the enjoyment of readers of this blog, and for the purpose of informing the public. My opinions do not necessarily refect the views of the editor and publisher of this blog. Readers of this information should be aware of possible unforseen, and/or unintended consequences, for which I take no personal responsibility. Please, have a nice day.

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    • Hope you don’t feel a need to add a disclaimer to all your comments.

      I’ve written here about how the Pentagon Papers were, in my view, just an collaborate scam to introduce fabricated history into the mainstream for scholars to absorb. I am going to read the Muggeridge piece later. But it appears to me that introduction of bogus news and history is largely a confidence game – what steps are taken in advance to deceive the intended audience that the information is genuine. The Pentagon Papers were a huge effort, and I think largely to act as part of the cover-up of the JFK murder done from within government.

      Anyway, on with my day. Have you read Buckminster Fuller? Was it you who recommended him to me?

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    • JC says:

      ███ Director ██████ █████ ███████ said █████ ██ ████ stupid ████████ █████ █ ███████████ ███████████ fuck █████ ████████ ██████ ███████ head █████████████ ████████████ idiots ████████████ love the █████████ ███████ ██████████ surveillance ███████████ █████████████ █████████████ state. ███ ███████ ██ so give them ████████ ███████ ████████ ██ █████ what they ███ █████ ██ ████ want.

      ███ █, ███

      Liked by 1 person

  2. steve kelly says:

    re: the disclaimer….. just trying to have a little fun, which may be the center of my existence, and which seldom translates well via electronic media. And you know how 21st-Century puritans deal with those obviously having too much fun. Seems to me, a lot like the 17th-Century edition. Gotta’ go, trying to get in a quick float on the Yellowstone River today.

    Can’t remember recommending Fuller, but he was a favorite of mine in the 1970’s and early 1980’s. Nobody quite like him to this day.

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    • I said Muggeridge, but I guess I am reading Marchetti. I have a problem with “rogues” like him as he’s under a contract of secrecy and is liable to end up in jail or worse for speaking up, and then nothing happens when he does. To me it looks like limited hangout, or better yet, just an agent doing his job.

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