Me and Mrs. Jones

In Jim Jones: The Fake Early Years, Mark devoted some of the article to Jim Jones’ genealogy. Of course, this piqued my interest, so I decided to see if I could dig a little deeper. What I discovered has me somewhat baffled since it was so easily unearthed. If the information was purposely planted, I can’t imagine what the motive could have been. On the other hand, if the connection is authentic, I don’t understand why it was not covered up. But before I divulge that “strange relation,” I’d like to share some other discoveries I stumbled upon relating to Jim Jones’ mother, Lynetta Putnam(This article will be my small contribution to the impressive amount of information already accumulated by Gaia.)

Jim’s mother is only mentioned six times on his Wiki page, and four of those instances are in the “Explanatory Notes”:

  1. While Jim Jones claimed to be partially of Cherokee descent through his mother Lynetta, this story was apparently not true.
  2. Lynetta’s cousin Barbara Shaffer said, “there wasn’t an ounce of Indian in our family.”
  3. Shaffer said that Lynetta was Welsh.
  4. The birth records for Lynetta have since been lost.

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The Sewing Circle – (Part 1)

This article is just my opinion based on the lifestyles of the subjects profiled.

“Sewing Circle” is a phrase used to describe the underground, closeted lesbian and bisexual film actresses of Hollywood, particularly during Hollywood’s golden age from the 1910s to the 1950s.  The actress Alla Nazimova (godmother of former first lady Nancy Reagan) was the one credited with coining the term.  Many of the actresses that I will be profiling in this series were rumored or admitted lesbians.  The remainder were childless and/or unmarried throughout their lives.  Since women can have several reasons for not having children, this does not prove anything.  You may decide for yourself.  Keep in mind, though, that over the course of the 19th century, the average American woman gave birth to six children, not including children lost to miscarriages and stillbirths.  And globally, up to 1965, the average woman had more than five children.

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None of the birth control methods of the 19th century (aside from infanticide and abortion) were particularly effective, and none of them were new.  Withdrawal by the male, douching and vaginal suppositories were around in ancient times and common in the 19th century.  In 1838 condoms and diaphragms were produced with vulcanized rubber. It was second in popularity to withdrawal but was not advocated as birth control.  Instead, it was to be used to prevent venereal disease.  The most effective form of birth control was (and still is) abstaining from sexual intercourse (with men).

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The Middle Ages never ended

During the frenzy of the past couple of weeks, I took time off to engage in other pursuits. In particular I have been focused on Immanuel Velikovsky’s Mankind in Amnesia, which dovetails very nicely with other things I have read about on the effects of child abuse in younger and formative years.

Children that are traumatized in early years usually develop effective defense systems that they carry with them throughout their lives, often misdiagnosed as some sort of mental “illness” like “bipolar” or “ADD.” In fact, these particular “diseases” are rare, but child abuse is, sadly, common. The great manual of collected drivel that the mental “health” professions use to match their disorders with available drugs is the DSM-5. That desk reference, as Dorothy Parker famously said, should not be set aside lightly. It should be thrown with great force.

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The Waco Massacre: Wanton destruction of a movie set

The Waco Massacre was the closing act of a 51-day siege took place from February 28th to April 19th, 1993. It has all the hallmarks of a psyop. I doubt anyone died, and in fact doubt that there were any people placed in the building during the 51 days except for photo ops. It was just a movie set. So I suggest there were but a few hired actors to play “survivors,” some fake jail sentences, but in reality no “Branch Davidians.” Just an empty building surrounded by frenetic activity.

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Planning for an event of this nature had to have gone back years, so that I speculate that when Vernon Wayne Howell (who later changed his name to David Koresh) moved his “Branch Davidians” to the Mt. Carmel complex in 1989, it was done knowing that it would be the center of a psyop and a movie. Further, I expect that the date April 19th would be chosen knowing that two years hence another fake mass killing, the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, would take place on the same date.

As to the significance of the date 4/19, it was the 109th day of the year, and 109 is the 29th prime number, and that yields 11, and that is a long way to go to make a point and feels like a reach. But I’ll be damned if 11 does not pop up again and again.

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Note to readers

It was plain to see yesterday that the fake school shootings in Broward County had captured everyone’s attention, so I delayed the Waco piece I put up yesterday until later next week.

22727CB7-A5BD-40BF-86BC-EACD620AB604Again we are faced with the spectacle of tearless anguish. I mentioned on Facebook how odd it is that these two are not generating real tears, and was told that they are just cried out. You’d think the people behind these tragedies would invest in a bottle of Visine.

Anyway, I put too much sweat equity into the Waco piece to watch it slip away in quietude. Will try again after this tragedy has become ancient history, maybe Wednesday.

How to spot a fake event

[Note: This will be our last post in this format. By midday tomorrow, a new format that allows immediate access to all our writers and their work will be used. ]


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This is an attempt to come up with a set of criteria by which we can judge whether a terrorist event is real or fake. I put together a list of behaviors by police, medical and news people.

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Fake shooting event in Denver, 11/1/17, 11 PM

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Mass murder suspect Scott Ostrem

Numeric signals, I know, are a matter of uncertainty with readers here. I have wondered if I merely find what I am looking for … confirmation bias, but they are too prevalent and consistent, way too predictable.

We had a mass murder last night in Denver last night. A man supposedly walked into a Walmart and just started shooting people. He hit three, they all died. He was a very good shot. [He fired thirty shots, hit three people. Got it?]

OstremThe photo of Ostrem, whose name appears scrubbed at Geni.com, has been bugging me. Do you notice, as I do, a different shading of skin color around the eyes? It is almost as if they have inserted a pair of sinister and close-set eyes in the photo. Or, he could have an occupation that requires he wears goggles  … welder? Aviator? Does he wear a hat for a living that keeps his high forehead covered? And what is with the pink cardigan and high collar – it looks effeminate, almost as if they pasted his head on a woman’s shoulders.

But overall, this photo does strongly resemble that if the man leaving a store down below. Keep in mind that we make assumptions when watching news, and don’t verify. The photo of this man and the man below being the same man only means that they are the same man, and not that this man committed any crimes, or that the photo below was taken at WalMart in Thornton. Maybe it was, but we need to verify details, something that is never done with news broadcasts. People just accept them at face. If this is a fake event, both photos could have been taken anywhere, anytime.

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