Note to readers

It was plain to see yesterday that the fake school shootings in Broward County had captured everyone’s attention, so I delayed the Waco piece I put up yesterday until later next week.

22727CB7-A5BD-40BF-86BC-EACD620AB604Again we are faced with the spectacle of tearless anguish. I mentioned on Facebook how odd it is that these two are not generating real tears, and was told that they are just cried out. You’d think the people behind these tragedies would invest in a bottle of Visine.

Anyway, I put too much sweat equity into the Waco piece to watch it slip away in quietude. Will try again after this tragedy has become ancient history, maybe Wednesday.

Tipping one’s hand

Home Run Derby was a television show that aired for one season back in 1960, ending abruptly when the announcer died of a heart attack. The show pitted two major league sluggers against each other for a chance to win 2 g’s. Two grand in that era was perhaps 5 to 10 percent of a ballplayer’s salary so the best and the biggest participated. Mickey, Willie, Hank etc. In that arrangement, the pitcher, a retread former hash slinger from the minors, tossed eat me lobs at these hall of famers and in all of the couple dozen or more contests that aired into the summer, no one really went crazy, as Aaron Judge did in this year’s derby at the all star game in wherever the hell it was held. In an hour plus, Judge hit something like fifty homers to win by a wide margin. In 1960, Jackie Jensen, a real piece of work that guy, managed a show best total of only 14 taters in his contest. Continue reading “Tipping one’s hand”

Link to a link to POM, and the hidden Internet

Josh over at Cutting Through the Fog reprinted a remarkable piece he did here, linked off to the side here under “Public Hoaxes” as “Jew-S-A!“. It is remarkable because he recognized a guy used in “fabricated*” news from a video about a car crash in Arizona … almost needle in the haystack work.  Want proof that the same guy was used in two unrelated and minor psyops? Check the tattoo on his arm. That is simply good work. There is an addendum at the end.

Continue reading “Link to a link to POM, and the hidden Internet”

Frisco gets another turn on the hoax wheel-

On Wednesday afternoon, 12:20pm, October 18th, 2017, a San Francisco police officer on bicycle patrol was hit by a suspect driving a stolen vehicle. I believe the assailant was under investigation for illegal firearms possession. (No private guns allowed in SF after the Milk/Moscone hoax) He was later apprehended at 3:30pm (of course).

Facebook and Twitter spread the word as this happened and a friend of mine found herself and her entire neighborhood under a “shelter in place” order from the SFPD. To my knowledge, this is the first time that order has been issued in Frisco. That got my antennae up. Continue reading “Frisco gets another turn on the hoax wheel-“

Trotter and LeBon … Trotter and LeBon … Trotter and Le ….

This may seem off-topic given our current focus on Las Vegas, but I think plays right in.

Edward Bernays, nephew of Sigmund Freud and “father of modern advertising” wrote a book in 1928 called “Propaganda,” an easy read and accessible for anyone with basic reading skills. But the content of that book surely was not meant for the everyman, so I have to suspect that the reading habits of the American public then were like now, only a few engaged. He was talking over the crowd to the people in the balcony who could rattle their jewelry in appreciation.

Continue reading “Trotter and LeBon … Trotter and LeBon … Trotter and Le ….”

Controlling the Aftermath

(In an effort to provide more manageable comment space for this very Clues Forum style debate over what happened in Vegas, I offer a few thoughts on some of the topics raised.. and yes, ‘Troll’ is right there in the headline…)

I walk in and out of a hospital almost every workday. During a crisis, beyond the private security in the building, local police help with crowd control. My hospital is part of a state university so the campus has its own full time police department. When needed in the building, officers are stationed in the public pathways, not in the ICU or convalescent areas. To secure a portion of a hospital for phantom vicsims beyond public scrutiny would not be difficult. The police are certainly not going to ask inconvenient questions when so deployed. Continue reading “Controlling the Aftermath”