Nazionism Part 2 – Meet the Boss

One of the most iconic, to the present day, participant in the Nazionism Plot was of course the fashion designer for the Nazi uniforms, Hugo Boss.

Born in Metzingen, close to Stuttgart, back then a town of about 5000 people, but already a center of the textile industry. Those of us who have read Miles Mathis’ articles know how wealthy jews dominated that industry for long. And Hugo Boss, not included in his overview of jewish Nazis, was no exception. I looked into Boss just a few weeks before MM released his jewish Nazi paper, now a bit more on him.

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The Sewing Circle – (Part 1)

This article is just my opinion based on the lifestyles of the subjects profiled.

“Sewing Circle” is a phrase used to describe the underground, closeted lesbian and bisexual film actresses of Hollywood, particularly during Hollywood’s golden age from the 1910s to the 1950s.  The actress Alla Nazimova (godmother of former first lady Nancy Reagan) was the one credited with coining the term.  Many of the actresses that I will be profiling in this series were rumored or admitted lesbians.  The remainder were childless and/or unmarried throughout their lives.  Since women can have several reasons for not having children, this does not prove anything.  You may decide for yourself.  Keep in mind, though, that over the course of the 19th century, the average American woman gave birth to six children, not including children lost to miscarriages and stillbirths.  And globally, up to 1965, the average woman had more than five children.

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None of the birth control methods of the 19th century (aside from infanticide and abortion) were particularly effective, and none of them were new.  Withdrawal by the male, douching and vaginal suppositories were around in ancient times and common in the 19th century.  In 1838 condoms and diaphragms were produced with vulcanized rubber. It was second in popularity to withdrawal but was not advocated as birth control.  Instead, it was to be used to prevent venereal disease.  The most effective form of birth control was (and still is) abstaining from sexual intercourse (with men).

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Assumptions, assumptions, assumptions …

A few years back I was alive with the excitement of a discovery that changed my outlook, that “Paul McCartney” was actually two men, a set of twins. Once I got a thorough immersion in their faces, they became easily to tell apart, so that I can easily see that today’s Paul McCartney is actually “Mike,” though we do not have the luxury of knowing their real names.

That information in tow, I put together a (in retrospect, sloppy) blog post on the matter, and submitted it to Miles Mathis. He rejected it as not up to standards, which I easily accepted, as I was indeed a newbie. At a certain point in the succeeding conversation he suggested one flaw in my writing: “You make too many assumptions.”

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