Nazionism Part 1 – Hitler’s Psychic

As a start of the huge Nazionism topic, announced in my audio recording of The Great H Mystery, I would like to highlight a remarkable figure.

In order to fully grasp the theory of Nazionism, it is important to understand how they staged that mystery. Nazionism deals with the why behind that humongous plot that still dominates to this day and most probably will for the next generations to come.

For those interested in this topic, Tyrone McCloskey’s series is a must-read, as is the series by Miles Mathis about Dolfy “Hitler” and his buddies.

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The Great H Mystery

Few plots are so peculiar as the biggest of them all. In terms of scope, people involved, culture creation, social engineering, money scam (only superseded by the AGW – Anthropogenic Global Warming one) and the single one of them covered by (weasel) laws. The Great H Mystery is more controversial than any other, and that means proper language is even more needed with this one.

I have shared the excellent overview article before, but last month finally recorded reading the paper at Hoax Busters Call, together with my fellow truth seeker kelito from Scotland. The article is long, yet concise, for an era about which more textbooks are written than someone can read in a lifetime. What makes this particular paper so great is that it summarizes all poignant points in an academic, scholarly way, assessing all the peculiarities of this plot and above all that it does not go into childish lalala-hahaha-hoax mode, seen so often when treating this sensitive subject which cannot be called “a hoax” as too many real things unfortunately happened.

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Peculiar Plots – The Great Escape

Before I return to the earlier Peculiar Plots, I stumbled upon this story, that deserves being part of the series. Again, the plot is so ridiculously contradictory, that it baffles people actually believe these kinds of plots. The plot holes are so deep and pervasive, the story could just be called a talking Swiss cheese.

The Stalag Luft III allegedly was a prisoner-of-war (POW) camp of Nazi Germany in the extreme east of the Altreich (the borders of Germany pre-WWII), in present-day Poland. It is said there were “10,949” prisoners (unknown if this is a cumulative number or the maximum at one moment) consisting of British RAF and US American USAF and other nationality prisoners. The two compounds of the camp are said to have been guarded by 800 Nazi officers.

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A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets

I’m sure many of our “baby boomer” friends will remember the soap ads from the 1950s and 60s.  Clean was big business then, clean was beautiful, and nobody wanted to stink.  B.O. (body odor) was a hot topic thanks to decades of marketing.

Dial wasn’t the first “deodorant” soap, but it was the first one that didn’t smell like turpentine or paint thinner – oh, I’m talkin’ “Lifebuoy.” Lifebuoy, originally made by Lever Bros. (now Unilever) in England, has been around since 1895.  The smell was phenol, a compound made with carbolic acid extracted from coal tar.  To fight B.O. you could instead smell like an auto body repair shop.

Dial, named for its “round-the-clock” anti-B.O. protection (from perspiration), was introduced in 1948 by Armour Co. (yes, the meat-packers) in Chicago. Armour had made tallow-based laundry soap since 1888.  With the help of some clever chemists, Armour added hexachlorophene, or G-11 or AT-7.  How about those numbers?  Continue reading “A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets”

“To a Mouse, on Turning Her Up in Her Nest with the Plough”

by Robert Burns (1785)

Burns’ Original Standard English translation
Wee, sleekit, cow’rin, tim’rous beastie,
O, what a panic’s in thy breastie!
Thou need na start awa sae hasty
Wi bickering brattle!
I wad be laith to rin an’ chase thee,
Wi’ murd’ring pattle!I’m truly sorry man’s dominion

Has broken Nature’s social union, An’ justifies that ill opinion
Which makes thee startle
At me, thy poor, earth born companion
An’ fellow mortal!

I doubt na, whyles, but thou may thieve;
What then? poor beastie, thou maun live!
A daimen icker in a thrave
‘S a sma’ request;
I’ll get a blessin wi’ the lave,
An’ never miss’t.

Thy wee-bit housie, too, in ruin!
It’s silly wa’s the win’s are strewin!
An’ naething, now, to big a new ane,
O’ foggage green!
An’ bleak December’s win’s ensuin,
Baith snell an’ keen!

Thou saw the fields laid bare an’ waste,
An’ weary winter comin fast,
An’ cozie here, beneath the blast,
Thou thought to dwell,
Till crash! the cruel coulter past
Out thro’ thy cell.

That wee-bit heap o’ leaves an’ stibble
Has cost thee monie a weary nibble!
Now thou’s turned out, for a’ thy trouble,
But house or hald,
To thole the winter’s sleety dribble,
An’ cranreuch cauld.

But Mousie, thou art no thy lane,
In proving foresight may be vain:
The best-laid schemes o’ mice an’ men
Gang aft agley,
An’ lea’e us nought but grief an’ pain,
For promis’d joy!

Still thou are blest, compared wi’ me!
The present only toucheth thee:
But och! I backward cast my e’e,
On prospects drear!
An’ forward, tho’ I canna see,
I guess an’ fear!

 

Small, crafty, cowering, timorous little beast,
Oh, what a panic is in your breast!
You need not start away so hasty
With your hurrying scamper
I would be loath to run and chase you,
With murdering plough-staff.I’m truly sorry man’s dominion

Has broken Nature’s social union,
And justifies that ill opinion
Which makes you startle
At me, your poor, earth born companion
And fellow mortal!

I doubt not, sometimes, but you may steal;
What then? Poor little beast, you must live!
An odd ear in twenty-four sheaves
Is a small request;
I will get a blessing with what is left,
And never miss it.

Your small house, too, in ruin!
Its feeble walls the winds are scattering!
And nothing now, to build a new one,
Of coarse grass green!
And bleak December’s winds coming,
Both bitter and piercing!

You saw the fields laid bare and wasted,
And weary winter coming fast,
And cozy here, beneath the blast,
You thought to dwell,
Till crash! the cruel plough passed
Out through your cell.

That small bit heap of leaves and stubble,
Has cost you many a weary nibble!
Now you are turned out, for all your trouble,
Without house or holding,
To endure the winter’s sleety dribble,
And hoar-frost cold.

But little Mouse, you are not alone,
In proving foresight may be vain:
The best laid schemes of mice and men
Go often askew,
And leave us nothing but grief and pain,
For promised joy!

Still you are blessed, compared with me!
The present only touches you:
But oh! I backward cast my eye,
On prospects dreary!
And forward, though I cannot see,
I guess and fear!

 

 

Peculiar Plots – Part 2 – Shackled by Tons of Ice

After the Ludicrous Lusitania, I think it is time to look at yet another Peculiar Plot of the early 20th century, the contemporaneous incredible, miraculous and chilling voyage of Ernest Shackleton to the South Pole. And beyond. Or rather not.

This plot is published at Wikipedia in not one, not two, but seven (!) Featured Articles (FA). Mán, they really want this peculiar plot to be carved into the minds of the people. And so it deserves a decent break-down, over multiple posts.

Allegedly, British polar explorer Ernest Shackleton (FA #1), sorry Sir Ernest Shackleton, experienced from earlier (supposed?) exploration, set sail for an extreme expedition; with a group of hardened men his plan was to cross Antarctica and be picked up by another crew on the other side and shipped back to civilization.

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Peculiar Plots – Intermezzo – O Gran Fogo

A short intermezzo from the peculiar plots, as I just saw this:

A large fire broke out at the Paço de São Cristóvão, which houses the 200-year-old National Museum of Brazil, in Rio de Janeiro, on September 2, 2018, at around 19:30 local time (22:30 UTC September 2). Reaction to the cultural loss was swift, as the museum held over 20 million items — Brazil’s president Michel Temer called the loss of the historical and cultural heritage “incalculable”. The cause of the fire has yet to be determined.

A large fire breaking out last night in Rio de Janeiro, hmm, let’s look at this story…

Shortly after closing on September 2, 2018, a large fire broke out, reaching all three floors of the National Museum building. Firefighters were called at 19:30 local time, arriving quickly at the scene. Despite this, the fire chief reported that the two fire hydrants closest to the museum had no water.

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