Opportunity lost, and the Battle of France

By: Kerry Anderson

I know most of the readers are familiar with the battle of France but allow me to bore you with a quick rehash for the benefit of others.

On the 10th of May, 1940 the phony war came to an end. The French battle plan relied on a string of well-developed fixed fortifications ( the Maginot Line ), which ran along the Southern part of the border with Germany and then kind of petered out in the Verdun sector. Due to various reasons, primarily underground water, industrial development in the area, and lack of public support for its extension, the line was never completed. The solution was two large army groups covering the northern sector, and a third (Ninth Army) acting as the hinge between the North and South.

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Stonehenge, the oxymoron

I’ve been traveling these last couple of weeks,  maybe running from Father Time? I’ve experienced something so unusual that it needs to be memorialized … I’ve had nothing to write about! During this period (which included my 68th birthday) my lovely wife gave me a wonderful gift: Three books, two by Immanuel Velikovsky and one by his daughter. I’ve been engrossed.

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Guest writer: The Battle of the Atlantic

Kerry has promised more writing on this and other topics surrounding World War II. I look forward to the discussion that naturally follows, as our readers are well-versed on this topic as well.


The Battle of the Atlantic (By Kerry Anderson

After the fall of France, The Kriegsmarine now had access to the French ports. This was advantageous for a number of reasons.

  1. Safer access without having to run the gauntlet of the English Channel.
  2. Convenience to the Atlantic shipping lanes.
  3. Easier to repair and supply their naval vessels.

However, the policy of raiding and submarine warfare was a controversial one. Erich Raeder, a veteran of the First World War, was a detractor, believing it to be a flawed strategy, which of course it was. In 1939 he approved a change in the German shipbuilding schedule, abandoning capital ships for submarines. In conflict with his earlier beliefs. The problems with such a strategy were as follows.

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The three amigos

Note: Kerry promises three more installments to follow in a piece I thought would be a great jumping-off point for commenters.

By Kerry Anderson

As historian buffets go, There is probably no other table quite like the Second World War. Involving over 50 countries and uncountable tribes, ethnic groups, and organized gangs.

It was certainly a World War by most definitions. Casualties, which seem to take up a large chunk of the research space, are a bit hard to pin down. Depending on when one wishes to place the starting line, It could be counted as 5 years, or even longer if one chooses the invasion of Manchuria. Many factors combine to make any calculation of casualties more speculative than hard fact. The lack of accurate population totals both before and after is a big one. Determining the ultimate fate of many people is also a problem, many displaced, missing in action, or simply dropping out to continue their lives, could account for many.

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The Jewish question …

A certain writer/researcher we know and admire (speaking for myself) is often seen to be uncovering this or that person’s Jewish roots. That particular question is on our ‘don’t go there’ list on this blog, but what the hell, let’s go there. As long as you are not full of hatred, and do not imagine that Jews have murdered a gazillion people, have at it.

Who are these ‘Jews’? How did they become so powerful? How do they manage to mask their heritage? Are they evil?

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The Dreyfus Affair on Trial

Miles Mathis posted a paper I wrote showing that the famous Dreyfus Affair was a manufactured hoax. For those of you coming here from that paper, welcome! Below I have a brief clarification about the goals of the Dreyfus affair plus a bonus outing of another French spook. But first a few preliminaries:

I am a new addition to the blog here along with several regulars who have until now only contributed to the comments section. Mark Tokarski is the captain who prefers to stay out of the limelight. He welcomes thoughtful comments and constructive criticism. But he runs a tight ship, so please be thoughtful and respectful when commenting or you might have to walk the shill plank. (-;

Mark, along with another contributor who goes by straightfromthedevilsmouth (or ‘straight’ for short), has discovered a shocking number of celebrities who we know as a single persona but are actually ‘played’ by identical twins. If you’ve read Miles’s work, you know that Intelligence loves twins, like Paul & Mike McCartney and Elvis & Aron Presley. Well it turns out those ones are just a drop in the bucket. You can find all of the twins uncovered so far in The Honor Roll of Twins on the right sidebar under the Blogroll. We have a working hypothesis that twins can be ‘engineered’ by artificial embryo splitting, but that’s for another day.

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