A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets

I’m sure many of our “baby boomer” friends will remember the soap ads from the 1950s and 60s.  Clean was big business then, clean was beautiful, and nobody wanted to stink.  B.O. (body odor) was a hot topic thanks to decades of marketing.

Dial wasn’t the first “deodorant” soap, but it was the first one that didn’t smell like turpentine or paint thinner – oh, I’m talkin’ “Lifebuoy.” Lifebuoy, originally made by Lever Bros. (now Unilever) in England, has been around since 1895.  The smell was phenol, a compound made with carbolic acid extracted from coal tar.  To fight B.O. you could instead smell like an auto body repair shop.

Dial, named for its “round-the-clock” anti-B.O. protection (from perspiration), was introduced in 1948 by Armour Co. (yes, the meat-packers) in Chicago. Armour had made tallow-based laundry soap since 1888.  With the help of some clever chemists, Armour added hexachlorophene, or G-11 or AT-7.  How about those numbers?  Continue reading “A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets”

Some Call it Forest Management, I Call it Racketeering.

When government agencies like the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management produce the danger, the propaganda hyping the danger, and the protection against it at a price, that’s racketeering.  The definition of a racketeer is someone who creates a threat and then charges for its reduction.

“War is just a racket. A racket is best described I believe, as something that is not what it seems  to the majority of people. Only a small inside group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few at the expense of the masses.”  – Smedley Butler

Government land management agencies commonly simulate, fabricate and exaggerate threats in ways common to all other racketeers.  Constantly at war with the forces of nature and the land they manage, this pattern of immoral extractive commerce targeting public land is a microcosm of a vast universe of Government Sponsored Enterprise (GSE).  GSEs generate huge profits for private companies and government, in partnership Continue reading “Some Call it Forest Management, I Call it Racketeering.”

Pharmaceutical Nightmare- My personal journey: Anti-depressants

About 15 years ago I was going through a very difficult and agonizing family upheaval. I was angry, not depressed, and felt the need to talk to a psychologist. Unfortunately, my insurance didn’t cover the services of a psychologist (who can’t prescribe medications), but it did include visits to psychiatrists.

I am no expert, nor am I a medical professional, but I have learned how to research and discover much-needed information about harmful pharmaceuticals. In this article, I will be sharing my personal experience with NSRI Anti-depressants (Nor-Epinephrine, Serotonin, Re-uptake Inhibitors.) Since two brain chemicals are involved, NSRI’s are much more difficult to taper (reduce dosage) than the older SSRI anti-depressants like Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil. Continue reading “Pharmaceutical Nightmare- My personal journey: Anti-depressants”

Snake-Oil Salesmen vs. Snake Oil-Salesmen, Part 1

The black-banded sea krait

Snake oil actually works.

Did you know that? I didn’t until recently. “Snake oil” has become a byword for useless and even harmful products that are marketed on the basis of false claims. When you call something “snake oil,” you’re saying it doesn’t live up to its hype.  There is a lot of snake oil in modern life: spiritual snake oil, political snake oil, organizational and corporate snake oil, even conspiracy theory snake oil.  Bullshit abounds under many brand names.

Except … actual snake oil, which really does work. Confused? Stay with me. Continue reading “Snake-Oil Salesmen vs. Snake Oil-Salesmen, Part 1”

How not to rebel?

Immanuel Velikovsky died in 1979. The following passage is from his book Mankind in Amnesia, published in 1982. I found it, like him, profoundly insightful. He describes a situation that has not changed in the intervening years. It is, in fact, much, much worse. We are surrounded not just by stagnated and bureaucratic science, but with corrupt science. Warm your globe on that.

Continue reading “How not to rebel?”

Trial by Fire

Last evening I participated as one of five presenters in a live-audience,  multi-media discussion/presentation with a group of foresters, a smoke jumper and State of Montana’s tourism specialist in the Dept. of Commerce.  The topic was “Can we manage wildfire; Should we manage wildfire.”  As the lone “tree-hugger” on the stage, I tried to probe other panel members for the reasons for their beliefs – most believed in management as a “solution” to our wildfire “problem.”  Needless to say, the anthropocentric viewpoint predominated.

Soldiering on, I tried very hard to interject a few self-evident truths about nature and fire’s natural role in the continuous mystery of life in its many forms.  When cornered with truth, however, the other participants simply lied to escape reality.  I’m sure they believed their lies, but even to the live audience lying seemed obvious, but generally an acceptable answer to a confrontation with an inescapable truth.  Continue reading “Trial by Fire”

Down the Rabbit Hole

Back in my youth there was a TV game show called “Camouflage” in which a large picture board was covered up, and contestants, after correctly answering a question, were allowed to see (as I recall) one-ninth of it. They were then asked to describe the whole picture. Often the brighter or luckier ones would guess right based on just a small portion of the larger screen. But we all know that “evidence” can be interpreted many ways, and without a final unveiling of the total picture, we will never be sure of what is true.

Bob Zherunkel’s original piece on Miles Mathis was surgically shortened to eliminate the part called “Down the Rabbit Hole” as I did not want to make perhaps unflattering speculations based on one-ninth of the evidence. We agreed that portion would be restored with the following proviso – we will use Mathis’ own words and allow the readers to draw their own inferences. We accuse him of nothing, as we do not know the whole story. We are, after all, only seeing part of a larger picture.

Below is the original piece in total, with the excised portion restored. MT

This is not a follow-up or response.  Robert Z., true to his word, will not offer one.  This is simply the original piece in its entirety, with the above-named section restored, along with related remarks throughout.

Extraordinary Claims Require Extraordinary Clowns

By Robert Zherunkel

Why do you believe what you believe?

Because you read it in the newspaper?
Maybe at one time in your life. But if you’re here, you’re way past that level of gullibility.

Because someone posted it on the Internet?
Surely all of us have made that big U-turn on the Disinformation Highway when we realized that we were being sent down a rabbit hole.

Because certain advocates claim something loud and long enough, stridently and even viciously?
Haven’t you heard the saying, “If you’re going to tell a lie, tell a big one!”?

Extraordinary claims, it is said, require extraordinary evidence. This saying is a little fuzzy, given that there is no generally accepted measure for “ordinariness.”  But the general idea holds up: if something seems too good to be true, it probably is untrue. Continue reading “Down the Rabbit Hole”