A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets

I’m sure many of our “baby boomer” friends will remember the soap ads from the 1950s and 60s.  Clean was big business then, clean was beautiful, and nobody wanted to stink.  B.O. (body odor) was a hot topic thanks to decades of marketing.

Dial wasn’t the first “deodorant” soap, but it was the first one that didn’t smell like turpentine or paint thinner – oh, I’m talkin’ “Lifebuoy.” Lifebuoy, originally made by Lever Bros. (now Unilever) in England, has been around since 1895.  The smell was phenol, a compound made with carbolic acid extracted from coal tar.  To fight B.O. you could instead smell like an auto body repair shop.

Dial, named for its “round-the-clock” anti-B.O. protection (from perspiration), was introduced in 1948 by Armour Co. (yes, the meat-packers) in Chicago. Armour had made tallow-based laundry soap since 1888.  With the help of some clever chemists, Armour added hexachlorophene, or G-11 or AT-7.  How about those numbers?  Continue reading “A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets”

Pharmaceutical Nightmare- My personal journey: Anti-depressants

About 15 years ago I was going through a very difficult and agonizing family upheaval. I was angry, not depressed, and felt the need to talk to a psychologist. Unfortunately, my insurance didn’t cover the services of a psychologist (who can’t prescribe medications), but it did include visits to psychiatrists.

I am no expert, nor am I a medical professional, but I have learned how to research and discover much-needed information about harmful pharmaceuticals. In this article, I will be sharing my personal experience with NSRI Anti-depressants (Nor-Epinephrine, Serotonin, Re-uptake Inhibitors.) Since two brain chemicals are involved, NSRI’s are much more difficult to taper (reduce dosage) than the older SSRI anti-depressants like Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil. Continue reading “Pharmaceutical Nightmare- My personal journey: Anti-depressants”

Snake-Oil Salesmen vs. Snake Oil-Salesmen, Part 1

The black-banded sea krait

Snake oil actually works.

Did you know that? I didn’t until recently. “Snake oil” has become a byword for useless and even harmful products that are marketed on the basis of false claims. When you call something “snake oil,” you’re saying it doesn’t live up to its hype.  There is a lot of snake oil in modern life: spiritual snake oil, political snake oil, organizational and corporate snake oil, even conspiracy theory snake oil.  Bullshit abounds under many brand names.

Except … actual snake oil, which really does work. Confused? Stay with me. Continue reading “Snake-Oil Salesmen vs. Snake Oil-Salesmen, Part 1”

Exit Cold War, enter AIDS

“The American people don’t read.” (Allen Dulles, 1963)

DuesbergI have long believed that the best way to hide something from public view in our country is to put it in a book. I have been reading one by Peter H. Duesberg,, “Inventing the AIDS Virus,” with the idea in the back of my mind that it would make great fodder for a long and informative blog post.

But then I realized that the best way for dissemination the information in the book is to suggest people read the book. It is all there, it is indisputable. HIV does not cause AIDS.  It is a harmless passenger virus. The main culprit in the rise of AIDS is not a virus, but rather personal habits in certain population segments, most notably drug abuse, primarily in the homosexual population. Among the many debilitating drugs they took during the heyday of the rise of AIDS were nitrite inhalants, also called “poppers,” which intensified orgasms and relaxed muscle tension, thereby making anal intercourse easier. Nitrites were the single largest cause of the AIDS “epidemic.”

Continue reading “Exit Cold War, enter AIDS”

Bloody good blood.

” Say what you like about my bloody murderous government,’ I says, ‘but don’t insult me poor bleedin’ country.”   Edward Abbey, A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (Vox Clamantis in Deserto) (1990)

With all the recent focus on peerage and landed gentry of the United States, and linkages back to distinguished, royal families of Great Britain, it seems to me that it all comes down to blood.

But how much do we understand about the blood in our own bodies? For example, which organ of the human body is most responsible for controlling blood pressure? Most people, when asked, simply do not know.  Not surprisingly, this important fact is not part of most public-education curriculum.  Continue reading “Bloody good blood.”

Thanks Obama

Josh, in his paper (part one) on the Business Plot, took a look at racketeering while on his way to other destinations. It works as in this example: Suppose you have a small business in an urban neighborhood, and a man comes in (wearing, if course, a Trilby hat and dark trench coat), and offers to sell you insurance to prevent your windows from being broken out. You have to buy the “insurance,” as it is understood that of you don’t, your windows will be broken out.

Continue reading “Thanks Obama”

Is there relief from Obamacare in sight? Nope.

[Postscript] I should have perhaps advised readers new to political intrigue (prior to diving into this piece) that deception in politics is of high quality and multileveled. Of course politicians lie all the time! They cannot serve two masters, the public and the financiers, at once. Beyond that, behind the scenes, there are no “parties” and all the sniping at each other that goes on in public is checked at the door when they work in private. Obamacare was decades in the making. It was put in place to stay in place permanently, a financial straightjacket, a massive new corporate subsidy just like Medicare D. The idea that Trump represents something new and different is hogwash, and the notion that he has the power, let alone the desire, to make changes to a long-running and achieved goal like Obamacare is just a political stage play. The purpose of this stagecraft is to convince people that Obamacare is something worth keeping. After all, if Republicans hate it … it must be good, right? We are witnessing mere reverse psychology.

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Liz Fowler

There are rumblings now, and have been since the “election” of Trump to the presidency, that changes are going to be made to “Obamacare.” I seriously doubt it. That bill, also known as “ACA,” or the Affordable Care Act, put us in an economic straight jacket. It gives insurance companies power over us that they will never relinquish voluntarily. If anything, Congress and Mr, Trump are now engaged in a ritual known as the Kabuki Dance, or a staged presentation where all the players know the final outcome.

Continue reading “Is there relief from Obamacare in sight? Nope.”