The “New Normal”: Are we there yet?

Is anyone still waiting for the end of all this global, digital flim-flam? Like perpetual (conventional) warfare, the ruling class can never quit inventing new methods to control the masses and snatching up an ever greater percentage wealth and natural resources (including “human capital” i.e. slaves). Psychopaths and sociopaths need someone else to blame for their own failings. But who is left to call an external enemy when the entire world is now controlled by one, unified power alliance? The so-called terrorists of the late 20th Century aren’t scaring anyone, and it’s pretty well known that they’re our terrorists, funded via our allies (Israel, Saudi Arabia,  United Arab Emirates  etc.) in the Middle East.

So, where are we in this endless game of fraud and deception? The New Normal (Phase 2) – Consent Factory, Inc.

CJ Hopkins over at Consent Factory, Inc. has a nice overview of our current situation.

“A globally-hegemonic system (e.g., global capitalism) has no external enemies, as there is no territory ‘outside’ the system. Its only enemies are within the system, and thus, by definition, are insurgents, also known as ‘terrorists’ and ‘extremists.’ These terms are utterly meaningless, obviously. They are purely strategic, deployed against anyone who deviates from GloboCap’s official ideology … which, in case you were wondering, is called ‘normality’ (or, in our case, currently, ‘New Normality’) … [t]he new breed of ‘terrorists’ do not just hate us for our freedom … they hate us because they hate ‘reality.’ They are no longer our political or ideological opponents … they are suffering from a psychiatric disorder. They no longer need to be argued with or listened to … they need to be ‘treated,’ ‘reeducated,’ and ‘deprogrammed,’ until they accept ‘Reality.’”

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Part 5: The Virtualization and “Thingification” of Children

Part 5 of the Series, “Of Monkeys, Mice and Men: From Natural Bodies to Digitized Bots”

Life has been incredibly busy on my end. However, I thought this was too important NOT to highlight. I hope you will watch the brief video above featuring the “Daily Pass” for children to regain physical access to public school, and then listen (see video below) to Alison McDowell (of wrenchinthegears.com), as she brilliantly unpacks the devastating implications — including the dehumanization and trauma-based mind control of our children. I have also included a relevant analysis (see second video below) by Peggy Hall (of thehealthyamerican.org). Please read here for a clear understanding of “thingification,” as explained by Alison.

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Teaching versus learning

Some time ago I read the 1971 book Deschooling Society by Ivan Illich (1926-2002). As is my custom, I place 3M flags on passages I want to revisit, and then later come back and re-read and even transcribe those passages into MS Word. Otherwise, it is as if I never read the book. It does not sink in. The second time around is the one that counts with me.

Today I was re-reading a passage by Illich on schooling that so resonated with me that I am reprinting it here. I learned how to read in first grade, how to do accounting in college, and about the tax code early on as a stumbling CPA. When I entered that profession, I was distressed at how little I knew compared to my colleagues, not understanding that we are all like that. Becoming good at what we do is purely on-the-job training. “Brilliant” students who come out of college and take on important roles are a rarity, the stuff of pulp fiction. (I usually put a work of fiction down when I see the words “brilliant young” in reference to a character. I lose willing suspension of disbelief.)

For me, I don’t think I learned anything of value in high school or most of grade school. My real education started in earnest early on and outside my classes.

Our friend and co-writer Steve Kelly refers to schools as warehouses. I could not agree more. We have to do something with these kids to get them out of our hair, so we put them in big buildings with regimented schedules and bells telling them to move about. If they are caught in the hall while class is in session, they better damned well have a pink slip.  (When I was a senior in high school I got hold of a packet of pink slips, which allowed me some freedom to roam.)  Most teachers I know refer to themselves as “educators,” I think because it sounds a little more like a noble calling than being a mere teacher. They look at their job as a mission, helping young people. Illich would set them straight. Here is the part I just transcribed.

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Thanks a bunch, Pogie

I am linking to a site I rarely visit, The Montana Post, run by award-winning high school English teacher Don Pogreba. “Pogie,” as he is known, is famous for the following exemplary form of argumentation … this a conversation I am making up but have experienced nonetheless:

Anyone anywhere: “But Pogie, I’ve got it right here that you’re wrong.”
Pogie: “What’s your source?”
AA: “It’s some research done from a book that was cited on a blog, Piece of Mindful.”
Pogie: That’s not reliable. I want the New York Times, Washington Post, CBS News, otherwise I don’t believe it.”
AA: But Pogie, that’s not the point. You’ve got to look at the material and judge it using your own brain.”
Pogie: “Get real. Give me a reliable source.”

This has long been my beef with Pogie, and maybe with modern education in general – he does not teach thinking. He teaches students to use other people’s brains instead of their own. The result is seen all around us, the masked masses, clueless as to why they are in such garb.

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My Beef with Elmo: Elmo’s World Order?

Today is the 51st birthday of Sesame Street. The show first aired on November 10, 1969.

As a child growing up in the 1970s, I occasionally watched Sesame Street (produced by Sesame Workshop). The Electric Company captured my interest much more, as did Captain Kangaroo, Land of the Lost, and re-runs of Lost in Space. I didn’t watch much TV though. 

Before I proceed with my general grievances with Sesame Street, I just want to air my personal beef with the show — and with Elmo, in particular.

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Monday morning ramble

I’ve decided to chuck the gym, as I have some things to discuss, seemingly connected, but I am not sure about that. Endure if you can.

Years ago my youngest daughter got a part-time job in a “gum shoe” movie theater, one that charged a buck for entrance and showed only shelf-worn pictures. She ran the projector, and so I was allowed upstairs to watch the machines flicker away. What I saw up there was a whole new movie experience. Down below in the theater, the movie is the thing, and I was totally absorbed in it. Up above it was a flickering light show, much like a light behind a fan, and I suddenly realized that when we watched movies, we are put in a trance.

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Trojan horse here, Trojan horse there, Trojan horses everywhere

Nearly everyone knows the epic tale of the Trojan horse. As I grew up without a classical education, I did not learn about this tale of deception until I was an adult. In fact, I experienced and observed this phenomenon in my own life . . . LONG before I ever knew the literary reference. 

Switching to more recent and relevant context, from malwarebytes.com, Trojans are defined as “programs that claim to perform one function but actually do another, typically malicious. Trojans can take the form of attachments, downloads and fake videos/programs.” 

The Coronavirus paradigm reflects the iconic Trojan horse tale, but has been inverted. It’s a virus of paradox — a Trojan virus, if you will. So, whereas Trojan computer viruses are seemingly benign programs that hide more malicious intent, this novel virus has been portrayed as malicious, but may be more of an exaggeration, and potentially even a misrepresentation of a threat. Whether or not you believe that there is a manufactured pandemic, or subscribe to the notion, “Never let a crisis go to waste,” both perspectives are consistent with a Trojan virus, as it has hacked the minds of nearly the entire global population. It’s the epitome of malware, whether conceived in a computer lab, or as a thought-form, or otherwise. It has been brought to life, and has brought the world to its knees — at the behest of the “scientific” elite. It has even affected those of us who seem immune to its mind-altering impact. 

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Me and Chainsaw Bob

I am a little bit spooked right now, seeing that Covid-denial is reason for shutting down a podcast. Can I be far behind? Why am I even here now? I can only think I fly under the radar. Nonetheless, If this were my last post, this would be my last post. I sincerely hope to be around for a long time. I do not know our future.

If still around, I will introduce a new fallacy to add to the list in the post after this. I also have a piece, a good piece, by Stephers ready to go. Sorry to make you wait, Steph. Ty, Steve, Faux, Maarten, throw in.
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Absurdity

491D9741-7120-4A1B-B38F-9F64C0723362Dear little Greta Thunberg being Time Magazine’s “Person of the Year” is testament to the bankruptcy of our news media, left with only a false front of supposed credibility in place of any honor or diligence. It’s like Barack Obama or Al Gore being given Nobel Peace prizes (I suppose Greta is in line for this too) for either doing nothing or for lying to the public … it shows us just how corrupt our major institutions are. If there is a prize to be had for honor and integrity, it is Diogenes and his lantern in search of an honest man. He is still searching.

Climate Change and Dunning-Kruger

I’m currently immersed in a book called The Deliberate Corruption of Climate Science by Tim Ball, PhD. Ball is a Canadian climatologist who was sued by Michael Mann, the SLAPP-happy climatologist whose pseudo scientific masterpiece, the Hockey Stick, was featured in IPCC publications and Al Gore’s movie. It took several years, but Ball won the lawsuit and Mann (or the forces behind him) was forced to pay all legal costs. The reason why the Canadian court ruled in Ball’s favor was simple: Mann was not genuinely pursuing the matter, and was apparently only suing Ball to make his life difficult. Ball is featured in a post-ruling interview here.

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