A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets

I’m sure many of our “baby boomer” friends will remember the soap ads from the 1950s and 60s.  Clean was big business then, clean was beautiful, and nobody wanted to stink.  B.O. (body odor) was a hot topic thanks to decades of marketing.

Dial wasn’t the first “deodorant” soap, but it was the first one that didn’t smell like turpentine or paint thinner – oh, I’m talkin’ “Lifebuoy.” Lifebuoy, originally made by Lever Bros. (now Unilever) in England, has been around since 1895.  The smell was phenol, a compound made with carbolic acid extracted from coal tar.  To fight B.O. you could instead smell like an auto body repair shop.

Dial, named for its “round-the-clock” anti-B.O. protection (from perspiration), was introduced in 1948 by Armour Co. (yes, the meat-packers) in Chicago. Armour had made tallow-based laundry soap since 1888.  With the help of some clever chemists, Armour added hexachlorophene, or G-11 or AT-7.  How about those numbers?  Continue reading “A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets”

An interesting journey fueled by our commenters

I just got done with an interesting journey this morning and yesterday, fueled by commenters on the post below. I’ll go through the links one by one, and urge you to follow my path for your own entertainment. Otherwise, I will summarize.

440 vs 435: Tyrone took us to this link. His comment was in part

“Separating emotion from critical function is the mandate of all pop culture, corporate division. “

That’s an important insight. I have long avoided advertising in all forms for that very reason, that the object of advertising is to distract us with one message while subtly inserting another. Of course, most often that “other” message is simply “buy this product.” The larger point is, however, that advertising is never straightforward. As one young ad executive told me once in a candid moment, the purpose of advertising is to get us to change our behavior. TV has long been the best medium for dispensing this message and altering our behaviors, as we are in a mild hypnotic state while watching.

Continue reading “An interesting journey fueled by our commenters”

$$$$ for Hypno-Apes

Fiat money has been in existence in the U.S. of America since 1973, the year Pres. Nixon removed the nation from “the gold standard.”

So, why are we stuck in pre-1973 thinking about how the federal government spends money to achieve its political (foreign and domestic) agenda.

I have attempted to write about this topic, with little or no reaction from POM readers.  Let me try another tact.  How about another author with a similar message, and some examples that might awaken the hypno-ape masses?  See:  Mulga, Japanese artist; http://mulgatheartist.net/en/shop/?post=267.

Repetition is how apes learn.  I repeat my(ape)self:  “ ….there is no tax-payer money” in federal finance/appropriations.  https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/09/21/taxpayer-money-threatens-medicare-for-all-and-every-other-social-program/

It’s never a matter of being able to “afford” health care or a “pay for” a retirement program that keeps us from eating out of dumpsters.  It’s a matter of whether or not Congress can find it in its greedy, self-serving, soulless existence to give a shit or not.  Obviously, we have a lot of work to do.  Patience, grasshopper.

Marketing 101

King Soopers

The biggest scams going in the United States these days are, of course, Obamacare and Medicare D, two racketeering enterprises where health insurance and drug manufacturers first created problems that were then “solved” by the government. But set that aside. I want to focus on a minor racket, that of grocery stores forcing us to carry “loyalty” cards so that we can “save” money when we shop.

Continue reading “Marketing 101”

Some Call it Forest Management, I Call it Racketeering.

When government agencies like the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management produce the danger, the propaganda hyping the danger, and the protection against it at a price, that’s racketeering.  The definition of a racketeer is someone who creates a threat and then charges for its reduction.

“War is just a racket. A racket is best described I believe, as something that is not what it seems  to the majority of people. Only a small inside group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few at the expense of the masses.”  – Smedley Butler

Government land management agencies commonly simulate, fabricate and exaggerate threats in ways common to all other racketeers.  Constantly at war with the forces of nature and the land they manage, this pattern of immoral extractive commerce targeting public land is a microcosm of a vast universe of Government Sponsored Enterprise (GSE).  GSEs generate huge profits for private companies and government, in partnership Continue reading “Some Call it Forest Management, I Call it Racketeering.”

Batter Up

The Montana Green Party is back in federal district court trying one more time to regain access to the November, 2018 general election ballot.  While it is often hard to see the sense of what one does, I remind myself that some 10,000 Montana voters signed the petition to grant us a chance to compete with the corporate-owned parties in this election cycle.  http://www.krtv.com/story/38882281/montana-green-party-files-suit-in-federal-court-to-gain-ballot-access

For me, this will be the third time challenging Montana’s election laws in federal court.  We’re batting 1000, so why stop now?  Both previous victories, however, did not result in placing the name(s) of candidates on the ballot.  This time is a little different.  Green candidates were certified for the election by the Sec. of State and county clerks before being removed in July by a state judge and Democratic Party — the complainant.

My question:  If elections mean nothing, why all the tight sphincters across state and federal agencies and the MSM when a no-name, third-party candidate gains ballot access in a tiny western state like Montana?

I hope to find out the answer in November.

Campaign of Illusions: Where the Zero Cut Movement to Save the National Forests Went Wrong

Zero-Cut No Commercial Logging again? A quarter century after it became the banner and guiding star for much of the grassroots forest movement, and then over a decade of semi-retirement, the campaign for this legislation is trying to mount a national revival. My question is simple: Is it the best strategy for a collapsed forest movement, daily confronting the debacle of rapidly increasing logging and roadbuilding in the national forests?

The combination of President Trump and an overtly hostile Republican-controlled Congress has shocked the grassroots, non-collaboration forest movement. Awakening from over a decade of a sort of slumber, these forest defense activists are daily burning up internet chat rooms with news chronicling cascading losses in Agriculture and Interior Department rules, regulations, administrative edicts, and newly-passed laws and congressional riders that roll back decades of environmental laws and court victories.

They are stunned to see the reality that their strategy of timber sales appeals and lawsuits are no longer holding back the bulldozers and chain saws of the timber industry and its U.S. Forest Service puppet. As they ponder these mounting losses, they watch their local forests logged with increasing ferocity, a comprehensive assault on public lands with transgressions that few imagined they would live to see. Continue reading “Campaign of Illusions: Where the Zero Cut Movement to Save the National Forests Went Wrong”