Part 1: A Star is Born ~ Ascent of the Techno-S’pore and the Descent of Man

Part 1 of the Series, “Of Monkeys, Mice and Men: From Natural Bodies to Digitized Bots

Governments should prepare for the “biodigital convergence”

~ Tse Hao Guang, Strategist at the Centre for Strategic Futures (CSF) in Singapore

As stated on September 10, 2020, in the article, “Bio-surveillance in the Era of COVID-19,” by Tse Hao Guang, “Canadian think-tank Policy Horizons has recently articulated the potential for a ‘biodigital convergence,’ where biological and digital systems interpenetrate to change the way we live, work, and even define what is natural or human. The rise of bio-surveillance, accelerated by COVID-19, is undoubtedly one undercurrent of this driving force. The need to ensure safety and order through more direct and fine-grained monitoring of human bodies has led to these new methods of sensemaking.”

What we are experiencing is a sporogenesis of technocracy, and more specifically, the augmentation of nature and humanity utilizing biodigital convergence — with the intention of propelling civilization into a post-nature and post-human existence. While the roots of technocracy trace back to the 16th century with Francis Bacon, who is recognized as the father of technocracy, there is a tiny 55 year-old country that has dispersed its techno-progeny spores across the world — that which is S’pore, or Singapore. 

Most researchers (including myself) have been focusing efforts on revealing the central role of The World Economic Forum as framing and influencing (with potential forethought) this plandemic scenario and its seemingly correlated world re-ordering. There are additional players afoot deserving of exploration and attention. 

There is a trail (more like a swarm) of s’pores emanating from “the little red dot” (AKA Singapore), that seems to be weaving together the techno-color dreamcoat blanketing this envisioned global transformation, including the re-genesis of homo sapiens. It seems fitting to evoke the story of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, as it is based on the Bible story of Joseph from the Book of Genesis — entailing dire predictions, slavery, temptation, and the preservation of fellow man. George Church and Ed Regis, in their book Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves, attempted to reassure readers, “But even if the rate of technological progress, including genomic technology and the march toward transhumanism, is not known in advance, it is at least within human control. And that should be a comforting thought.” 

Sorry, but I do not take any comfort in this assertion, particularly when the authors juxtaposed it with this statement, “At the end of such a great story you may ask, What’s next? The safest way to make a bet about a future event is to heavily influence it. Like many great stories, the story of the genome includes a moral, a prescription for the future. Twenty years, the length of time we’ve been able to read the language of DNA, seems ridiculously short compared to the long saga of the genome itself. But twenty years seems like an eternity now that key technologies (like electronics) are changing exponentially at a 1.5-fold per year rate, or even at the 10-fold per year speed at which improvements are being made in DNA reading and writing. Whether passive or active, we can study the future by projecting the consequences of taking either of two branches at the many forks in the road ahead—and taking each to its logical extreme.” 

How extreme are the transhumanists willing to go? 

When referring to the trend toward transhumanism and “Kurzweil’s Law of Accelerating Returns,” Church and Regis expressed, “Kurzweil himself holds that future technological change will be so rapid and profound that it will constitute ‘a rupture in the fabric of human history.’” 

My sincere concern is that this rupture may tear apart the very biological fabric that keeps us in harmony and balance with the sacredness of Nature. The fast and furious futurists’ techno-color fabric may seem glitzy and glittery to the unsuspecting masses now, but this revamped version seems off-the-hinges, and may ultimately, leave humanity chained in digital bondage—naked in a fully synthetic, cybernetic, bioengineered Garden of Eden—subjugated to a data-hoarding AI God.

In 2017, Parag Khanna, Founder & Managing Partner of FutureMap—a data and scenario-based strategic advisory firm (see Endnote 1)—wrote a short treatise, Technocracy in America: Rise of the Info-State (see Endnote 2). When discussing the notion of “Big Data,” Khanna noted that Singapore’s prime minister is a computer scientist, and “With the completion of a nation-wide fiber optic Internet roll-out, Singapore’s physical sensor network (‘Internet of Things’), provides enormous volumes of data . . .” Khanna urged that Western democracy be replaced by Singaporean technocracy. According to Khanna, “. . . it’s time to admit that America needs less of its own version of democracy—much less . . . Democracy alone just isn’t good enough anymore.” He argued, “The search for an optimal state form continues into the information age—and it should logically be called the ‘Info-State’.” Khanna continued, “Info-states such as Switzerland and Singapore are also the places where we can witness the best efforts at direct technocracy . . . Experiments in direct technocracy are already visible around the world from Estonia and Israel to the UAE and Rwanda to India and China—across both democracies and non-democracies.” Khanna emphatically urged, “Technocracy becomes a form of salvation after society realizes that democracy doesn’t guarantee national success. Democracy eventually gets sick of itself and votes for technocracy.” 

In 2010, Parag and Ayesha Khanna wrote an article for Big Think titled “Technocracy and Technology in Singapore. They explained that Singapore “wants to be a ‘living laboratory’ of R&D for the world’s multinationals while stimulating its own creative revolution towards the knowledge economy.” They posed the question, “But can it be done the Singaporean way—technocratically—instead of the organic Silicon Valley way?” They continued, “By and large, Singapore is not pursuing scientific discovery for its own sake, but rather identifying key sectors where it can marry leading-edge technology with the massive market opportunities of Asia: bio-medicine, clean-tech, and digital media . . . With respect to bio-medicine, it’s well-known that Asian societies have had fewer inhibitions with respect to research in controversial areas such as stem cells. What Singapore has in mind, however, is to capitalize on the convergence of Asia’s (read: China and Japan’s) aging and longer-living population trajectories. That means focusing on nano-medicine to improve the early detection of cancer, computerized medical devices to enhance the recovery of stroke patients, and boosting the sustainable manufacturing of chemically and biologically synthesized drugs. All of this requires a strategic hybrid of the research and development components of R&D, which Singapore has been building by luring some of the world’s top clinical scientists to its new Biopolis facility.” 

I plan to elaborate on the biomedical-centered Biopolis in a later installment. For now, I would like to focus on Singapore’s rising star—The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)—situated within the Biopolis complex, as described in the same 2010 article by Parag and Ayesha Khanna: “Data mining, cryptography, and human-robot communication are also receiving investment from Singapore’s A*Star, showing the government’s interest in the semantic web, artificial intelligence, and augmented reality.”

A*STAR was birthed on January 11, 1991, originally named the National Science and Technology Board (NSTB). In January 2002, it was re-named A*STAR. The innovation-centered agency is Singapore’s leading public sector initiative spearheading economic-oriented research to advance scientific discovery.

Sebastian Maurer-Stroh is a Senior Principal Investigator in protein sequence analysis at A*STAR’s Bioinformatics Institute (BII). Integral to the COVID-19 event, and as part of a collaborative study in January 2020, Maurer-Stroh reported on the first two cases outside of China to be “tested positive for SARS-CoV-2,” which was utilized to suggest the purported international spread. Maurer-Stroh was also an integral player in the Zika virus narrative in 2016, as he was responsible for tracing the historical evolution of the Zika virus genome

Another project central to A*STAR involves a kinship with the UK-based nanomedtech and bioelectronics company, QuantuMDx (QMDx). One of the main goals of their strategic collaboration, established in 2012, was to develop a DNA sequencing nanowire biosensor, to enable rapid genomic sequencing. A future development was to include a nanowire platform with built-in sensing circuitry. 

Something to note is that QMDx states that it “owns the exclusive worldwide rights to DNA sensing and DNA sequencing using nanowires.” In 2015, QMDx (see Endnote 3) partnered with Scienon, a German life sciences company, to bring their nanowire array to market. The array is comprised of nanowires printed with molecular probes, and is used to transfer biological material onto biosensor chips. 

Jonathan O’Halloran, CEO of QMDx boasts about his humble beginnings in his garage where he “studied biological processes and integrated them with a semiconductor biosensor.” On his LinkedIn page, O’Halloran states, “Using my rapid portable MDx device (Q-POC), we are building the ‘Internet of Life’ (focusing on pathogens) that will allow us to monitor in real-time and predict disease outbreaks. The device is essentially a Bio-API that allows us to instantly convert the genetic code to binary code at the site of outbreak, linked it to the cloud, with GPS data, and therefore network the genomes of living things through the internet.” You can see here a photo of Jonathan O’Halloran with his collaborators at A*STAR (2012).

I would like to draw attention to another Singaporean connection: McKinsey & Company (a global management consulting firm) enjoys a very special relationship with Singapore. As a “Tier 1 Member” of The Advanced Remanufacturing and Technology Centre (ARTC) — an A*STAR-led platform comprised of public-private partnerships — in 2017, McKinsey launched a global network of Digital Capability Centres (DCCs), with a key innovation hub in Singapore, to “help companies harness “the powerful emerging technological changes—known collectively as Industry 4.0—that are disrupting industries across the world.” 

On December 10, 2020, McKinsey (see Endnote 4) published an article in the McKinsey Quarterly, “How COVID-19 is redefining the next-normal operating model,” wherein the firm presents its perspective on how “pandemic accelerations” should be incorporated into business models. I have pulled several choice quotes, and I have placed emphasis (indicated in bold) on particularly salient points: 

“With everything disrupted, going back to the same old thing is a losing strategy. The strongest companies are reinventing themselves by embracing pandemic-driven change.”

“Business leaders tell us that the metabolic rate of their organizations has soared. Their companies have accelerated by adopting new ways to work. Boundaries and silos have been removed; new technology has been adopted quickly, delivering digital products that customers suddenly needed; decision making has accelerated and been pushed further down in the organization.”

“Leading CEOs have taken note of all this and have decided that there is no going back. They are actively taking advantage of this particularly malleable moment, where new ideas are becoming the foundation of new ways of doing business, to reinvent their companies in ways that simply make more sense for today’s—and tomorrow’s—economy. As historian Yuval Noah Harari puts it: ‘That is the nature of emergencies. They fast-forward historical processes.’”

The exigencies of the pandemic have given many companies a tangible experience of operating at unprecedented speed (exhibit). Companies that don’t lean into this emergent shift run the risk of being leapfrogged by those that do understand why a swift, nimble, and versatile operating model is best and necessary for uncertain times like these.” 

Thanks to the pandemic, many companies have embarked on experiments in which they’ve organized around outcomes, in flattened structures that replace physical colocation with hybrid models.”

Is it any surprise that, while the World Economic Forum has been held in Davos, Switzerland for more than fifty years, it was announced that their annual meeting in 2021 will be held in the shining star — Singapore? Could that be some covert signaling among the Davos elites? As reported in Forbes on December 7, 2020, “The event, called by organizers the first global leadership event to address worldwide recovery from the pandemic, will be held in-person.” As it turns out, Reuters stated in September 2020, that Singapore has the lowest death rate from the reported coronavirus in the world. This has been attributed to their “zealous testing and contact tracing;” however, I wonder if there is another explanation to explain this statistic.

Herein, I am suggesting that while an innovation-inspired society can be beneficial and assist in moving humanity forward responsibly . . . a techno-obsessed society may lead humanity to its devolution and ultimately, the extinction of humanity as we know it. 

Noted social philosopher, Ivan Illich, in his book, Tools for Conviviality (1973), warned about keeping the growth of modernization of science tamed with checks and balances. Illich considered a “convivial” society, one in which “modern technologies serve politically integrated individuals rather than managers.” In such a civilization, it is the individuals — not corporations, nor info-states — that clarify and set limits on technological growth through interpersonal discourse and interdependence, in accordance with evaluating our relationship to our technological tools within a natural scale of development. He emphasized, “When an enterprise grows beyond a certain point on this scale, it first frustrates the end for which it was originally designed, and then rapidly becomes a threat to society itself. These scales must be identified and the parameters of human endeavors within which human life remains viable must be explored.” 

Illich further warned that the exponential, unchecked speed of technological enterprise could restrain the natural creative capabilities of individuals, isolating them from each other, and locking them in a “man-made shell.”

It is becoming all too clear to me that the techno-engrossed controllers have no self-restraint and no boundaries. My point is that the notion of “trust the science,” is a hypnotic delusion, in which the somnambulant masses have resorted to blind trust (and in some instances idolatry) in the “experts,” with no desire, nor any conception that they need to be setting responsible limits. This is an illusory trap to propel us forward with no opportunity for reflection and restraint in any regard. To conclude with Illich, “People who have unlearned how to decide about their own rights on their own evidence become pawns in a world game operated by mega-machines . . . When communities have grown overconfident in science, they leave it to the expert to set the upper limits on growth. This mandate rests on a fallacy.” 

In the same year (1973) that Illich published the first edition of Tools for Conviviality, another author, Jacob Bronoswki gained much more traction among the slumbering masses, with his book The Ascent of Man. Bronowski envisioned that it is through science that humanity will ascend — as we unlock, and ultimately control, nature. While he was overly optimistic in his belief that humanity’s ascent will result from our discovery and application of knowledge, it is my belief that if we continue to build upon this shaky scientific blockchain-based scaffolding, without balancing the knowledge inherent in nature, we render the scaffolding of nature — including our natural bodies — obsolete, thereby resulting in the descent of man. 

Endnotes:

1) Parag Khanna was a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum, a fellow at the Brookings Institution, a Senior Research Fellow at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, a researcher at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a senior geopolitical adviser to U.S. Special Operations Command.

2) In Technocracy in America, Parag Khanna noted that Singapore is often described as the “world’s best run company.” Central to this stealth corporate model, that relies heavily on strategic planning and scenario-led thinking, is Singapore’s Centre for Strategic Futures (CSF). By governing through scenarios—experts and citizens converge to build realistic scenarios from which to instruct and construct policy. The CSF aggregates these scenarios, and is plugged into the World Economic Forum’s Risk Response Network and the Davos-based World Risk Forum. Much more could be said about the CSF, and it deserves an entire post on its own. However, I would like to highlight the CSF’s “sister outfit,” the Horizon Scanning Centre (HSC) as part of the Risk Assessment and Horizon Scanning (RAHS) program. As a core tool of the RAHS program, the HSC convenes an annual International Risk Assessment and Horizon Scanning Symposium (IRAHSS) gathering of futures practitioners. This Singaporean horizon scanning initiative analyzes signals of potential future shocks, utilizing computer-based tools for scanning and modeling, for the purpose of building resilient systems. 

In reference to the horizon scanning initiative, David Martin, Ph.D., founder and CEO of M·CAM® International (a global leader in intellectual property-based financial risk management), stated, “The implication of RAHS and its foresight into economic turning points in the horizon is tremendous. Many financial institutions already conduct their own risk assessment. However, with a platform to share information, especially across markets, this will be a more robust method of economic risk assessment and horizon scanning.” 

As Board Member at The Arlington Institute (TAI), and as a futurist, Dr. Martin helped with the launch of the RAHS. TAI’s efforts came to the attention of the government of Singapore in 2001, resulting in a two-year partnership to develop a tool suite called DIANE (Digital Analysis Environment). DIANE represented the beginning of a revolution in what TAI called “anticipatory analysis” — the process of analysis with the goal of anticipating the emergence of specific futures. It was the success of DIANE that led to the development of the “national surprise anticipation center” — the Risk Assessment Horizon Scanning (RAHS) program.

TAI was founded in 1989 by John L. Petersen, whose prior endeavors were mainly on behalf of  the Department of Defense, leading to his early TAI collaboration with the U.S. Coast Guard (see “The Road to 2012,” prepared in March 1993, by Petersen, and dedicated to his “best friend, Diane”). Incidentally, Petersen is a contributor to KurzweilAI.net. TAI provides assessment of major trends in key sectors (such as science, technology, energy, and space) defining the landscape of emerging futures, as well as offering global scenario development (including the use of “wild cards”) and agent-based modeling/simulation with respect to concerns including climate change, nanotechnology, bio-terrorism, genetic modification and biotech, augmented intelligence, and global epidemics. Several individuals from the Military and Intelligence sectors have served on the Board of Directors at TAI, including Betty Sue Flowers, Owen Wormser, and James Woolsey, Jr. (former CIA Director). 

TAI is committedto playing a significant role in facilitating a global transition to a new world that operates in a fundamentally different way from the past. The question begged by this perspective . . . What kinds of events could be the catalyst for a big, historical shift?

Returning to David Martin, he has served as an advisor to central banks, global economic forums, national governments, and the World Bank.

Prior to founding M·CAM®, Dr. Martin was the founding CEO of Mosaic Technologies, Inc., a company that developed and commercialized technologies in advanced computational linguistics, dynamic data compression and encryption, electrical field transmission, and medical diagnostics. He was a founding member of Japan’s Institute for Interface Science and Technology (IIST). Martin’s additional engagements include domestic and international technology transfer and clinical research in the fields of linguistic genomics, fractal financial-risk modeling, and cellular membrane ionic signaling.

As a matter of curiosity, given that David Martin has direct ties to TAI and its Intel and Singaporean affiliates, I find it peculiar that he featured heavily in the film, “Plandemic II: Indoctornation.” Further, Martin serves as an Advisor to the Constitutional Law Group, which played a central role in hosting the Philadelphia Freedom Rally on December 6, 2020. They had a substantial presence there, and its Director, Rick Martin, was a featured speaker. Why is the little red dot of Singapore connected to Dr. David Martin, and why is Dr. Martin, as depicted in the documentary, linked so deeply to the alleged exposing of this current “plandemic?” I question these correlations and agendas. Lastly, Dr. Martin spoke here (transcript provided) with Robert Kennedy F. Jr. in November 2020, in reference to his work as a patent researcher, “. . . our business, is we actually have to monitor every patent that issues anywhere on earth.” Imagine having the knowledge of all patents around the world. With that type of knowledge could come great power. Not only does Dr. Martin aggregate this knowledge, he also holds multiple patents himself, that enable him to conduct deep-tech computer modeling and analyses with this data.

3) Following is a white paper published by QMDx, “SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR Detection Assay – Design, Analytical and Multi-centre Evaluation of Clinical Performance.” Furthermore, here is a PR release from May 1, 2020, in which QMDx announced the launch of their SARS-CoV-2 assay targeting three genomic loci: the S,N and Orf1 genes.

4)  For anyone who still may not have considered how McKinsey & Company may be playing a catalytic role in the “pandemic-inspired” catapulting of the digital and virtual acceleration taking place before our eyes, here is a link to their extensive “deep-dive” special collection of essays reflecting their perspectives and insights with respect to the “post-pandemic reset” — in their words, “The Next Normal.”

5) This document titled “Society at Risk — Hunting Black Swans and Taming Black Elephants,” was presented by Peter Ho, Senior Advisor, Centre for Strategic Futures (CSF), on December 5, 2016, at a Conference called “Disrupted Balance — Societies at Risk.” It references Singapore’s “resilient response” to the reported SARS epidemic in 2002-2003, involving mitigation approaches such as “Whole-of-Government” and contact tracing — two strategies which have been applied to the current scenario. 

27 thoughts on “Part 1: A Star is Born ~ Ascent of the Techno-S’pore and the Descent of Man

  1. Wow! Great piece, Stephers. I got stuck pondering whether or not Parag Khanna believes his own bullshit about democracy or not. Transnational oligarchy seems quite in control, pushing technocracy over any silly notion of self-governance, making any rational notion of “free and fair” elections total make-believe. I suppose the (straw-man) “democracy” narrative is the best they’ve got — an easy (non-existent) opponent.

    https://www.mas.gov.sg/news/media-releases/2019/singapore-and-uk-to-enhance-cooperation

    Second, the City of London (Crown) connection is extremely strong, which leads me to question the “rags-to-riches” “history” of the former UK colony. Clearly, we’re not getting the whole picture in this relationship.

    Thanks so much for your research and synthesis. Excellent!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I am just a couple of paragraphs in but the depth, eloquence and substance in your Piece of Mindful, Stephers, is unrivaled. I am speechless and that doesn’t happen often, as the ones who have talked with me know damn well….

    Please consider coming on air on Eye am Eye Radio where we can bounce brains about the technocrazy Transmutant world, and especially what we, the people can do against this World of Maskedness*.

    I also linked your dystoproza (just came up now, needs work) in the Alfa Vedic Discord. He is a member of Eye am Eye Radio so best if we meet there but also please do come on his show, he had Elana Freeland this week, who you linked last week, so there is serendicity* already.

    I am so glad that Piece of Mindful got at this level, higher than ever with all respect for the former and other current writers.

    I have only scratched the surface of “transhumanism” and you mentioning Francis Bacon is interesting as I knew but forgot about it. Kurzweil and his buddy, forgot his name, were laughed at just like “conspiracy theorists” and within the truther community also former shill Alex Jones (look around you; every body locking themselves in their own FEMA camp). But now it becomes clear how much we did know meaning how much more we DO know.

    A form of transhumanism are the familiar YouTube recommendations and in those I saw in the last weeks multiple times mentioned the “Anthropocene”. It is the epitome of Transhumanism, Transgaiaism, making it seem we have a deep impact on the geology of the future (cf. Holocene, Pleistocene, Plio-, Mio-, Oligo-, Eo- and Paleocene, the “other” subdivisions of the Cenozoic; last 66 Ma).

    The sexyfication of tech and scaremongering with CIGs (contagious invisible ghosts) of the last decade and present is reminiscent of the All in Awe Space Race vs Duck and Cover Nuke Hoax. The extreme dialectic, their psychosadomasochism of inducing fear and joy to the max.

    I bet those niggajews* do torture rituals on Molly (MDMA) in their demonic dungeons.

    What makes Eye am Eye Radio podcasts unique, as a podchild of POM, via Fakeologist.com, is;
    1 – you can say anything you want; words are ours and they can’t get to us if we proudly use our own words; hence Eye am Eye Radio; respecting the mentalversity*
    2 – you get your best quotes not only back in the intros, but also on a dedicated Fakeopedia page where we can link and contextualize all the talking points nicely
    3 – the most dedicated podcast editing; I want to make a good product for the future and create a Podcast Thyme Capsule (thank you Winnie the Flu) for the future. Because we KNOW they are going to wipe us. So our task is to make sure we are not going to be wiped.

    We have the future of humanity on our shoulders, soldiers!

    *for serendicity, the World of Maskedness and many other Newspeak words that should be self-evident but may require background reading, see
    http://fakeologist.com/fakeopedia/index.php?title=Newspeak

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Gaia – Funny, I think I am better equipped to handle criticism (which I have had my share of here – wink, wink) than I am complements. I am deeply appreciative for the invite to Eye am Eye Radio. That said, I am still honing my writing capabilities (thanks to MT for this growth opportunity), and my ability to articulate via my spoken voice lags FAR behind. May I become a member of Eye am Eye, and be present as a listener – before delving into any speaking?

      Like

      1. Haha, of course. We have a good community of people and Discord is good for sharing information (if arranged well). We do chats irregularly and no worries, before we will have a show, I need to prepare much better. But we can do that in Discord.

        Another HUGE advantage of Discord is that the company denies responsibility for speech which works in our favor; free speech!

        Today I had an amazing unmasking = hope story, will try to save it for our chat and else you hear it before.

        One thing of the Mollycasts is that the intros are hardstyle. Why?
        1 – I love the music
        2 – it is truth music, and the reason I use the best songs with their lyrics
        3 – nobody knows it, outside of a small fan group
        4 – it is Dutch
        5 – hardstyle parties are the very best in the world; everybody loves each other (80-90 % is with their ‘Molly’) and it is a great example of the social individualism I embrace and build on, and mutual respect. That they have taken these amazing experiences (Qlimax!) from us, is a crime against humanity.

        But I perfectly understand the older ears here cannot handle Qlimax or Defqon.1 levels, so for them and all other fans of classical piano, 2 hours of hardstyle songs on the piano:

        Enjoy!

        Like

        1. I love the piano, thank you! It is rather 1 dimensional, though…and is in its own right beautiful nonetheless 🙂

          But sometimes I like 3Dimensional music 😉

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Glad you liked it!

            Of course it is not music written to be played this “dry”, or 1D as you call it.

            But consider what he makes of the originals;

            piano

            original

            tomorrow I release my Merrycast 2020 with this and more !
            Stay tuned, lots of groundbreaking thoughts and I touch upon some POM topics too.

            And the unmasking = hope story I mentioned before is included too, Stephers is hopefully preparing excellent keto Christmas dinners….

            Have an excellent Christmas everybody and talk with all friends, family and especially elders as much as you can!

            Take care
            No scare

            Like

  3. I mean, people run away with Shakespeare (never understood why, even in school), but this if this isn’t poetry, what is?

    The fast and furious futurists’ techno-color fabric may seem glitzy and glittery to the unsuspecting masses now, but this revamped version seems off-the-hinges, and may ultimately, leave humanity chained in digital bondage—naked in a fully synthetic, cybernetic, bioengineered Garden of Eden—subjugated to a data-hoarding AI God.

    Garden of Eden; note that Eve Online is the biggest mass multiplayer online of all
    Consumerism is the apple.
    nooo, of course, … it is Apple!

    Fuck, never saw that, now I cannot unsee it.

    Thank you Stephers.
    Sincerely.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Stephers, I find that I have to let your articles sink in for a while, then I go back and re-read them, and get more out of them each time I do. Your work is unusually packed not only with solid information, but a refreshingly grounded perspective.

    I’m just now catching up with information in your June Article, Getting to the Heart of the Social Distancing Matter. Through breathwork and meditation, I’ve begun exploring the power of the heart’s frequency, and changes it has brought about in my life in just a short period of time are astonishing. I mention this simply to express my appreciation for the way you bring very real, very honest hope and humanity to information that, in the hands of other writers, would just be depressing and foster a sense of utter hopelessness. What a gift your work is.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. SCOTTRC – “I find that I have to let your articles sink in for a while, then I go back and re-read them . . . ” I hear this A LOT from friends and family with whom I share my blog posts. I don’t necessarily see this as a positive, and I have attempted to chisel down my writing, to be more focused and concise. Yet, here I am presenting an incredibly dense, long-winded piece. The feedback here could have gone either way. I acknowledge that I ask a lot from readers at POM, and yet, where else could I present information in this vain? I chose to become a contributor here because I see no other forum in which the members (i.e. – readers, listeners) are able to fully grasp our current situation. The POM community (thanks to MT) is way ahead of the curve, and I am beyond grateful to be a part of it. I have learned so much from Mark, and I have also gained so much perspective and learning from regular commenters, such as you. You bring incredible insights and elevation to discussion here. So, I would say, we are all gifted with the work that we share here together.

      Like

    1. Rastus – Thanks for the positive feedback and the important link, noting your astute observation. Regarding the last sentence in that article by The Blaze:
      “If you don’t have a dedicated assistant or $25,000 to bribe your way to the front of the coronavirus vaccine waitlist, you can see approximately how many people are ahead of you by using the New York Times’ “Find Your Place in the Vaccine Line” tool.” . . . The vaccine tool mentioned in the NY Times was developed by Surgo Ventures in collaboration with Ariadne Labs (see here https://www.poynter.org/reporting-editing/2020/when-can-you-get-vaccinated-heres-the-story-behind-the-new-york-times-project-that-tells-you/ and here https://covid19vaccineallocation.org). I will do my best to elaborate more on the work of Surgo and Ariadne, and their collaborative work with behavioral scientists (including their efforts in “vaccine nudging”) in a future comment (and possibly a future blog post) . . .

      Like

  5. Hey Stephers, very nice piece with a strong finish. I agree with all said by commenters above, what an asset you are to this blog. I hope you can do a podcast or radio interview or two, as Gaia suggests. I just did one that will air sometime in the future … with William Skink. Turns out we like each other and a brief conversation lasted ninety minutes. It was fun! You might find such exchanges to your liking as well.

    And this is not a “but” or “however,” yet in reading I did not feel any great fear for the future. I look around me now and sense the deep despondency in the masses, coupled with a level of ignorance and indoctrination, or brainwashing, that puts me in a dystopian frame of mind. For all the potential there is in humanity, this has to be a low point in human development. If, from what you say, the future direction is downward, yikes! Instead, I want to hold out hope for improvement of the human condition. I mean, have you been to Walmart?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. As I see it, the Drosten-Corman paper was just a rollout for the pandemic, written years in advance. Drosten is now having certification problems, that is, Goethe University does not have his doctoral dissertation on file, as required by German law. He claims that two copies are lost, and that the third is water damaged. He said nothing about a dog eating one of them. He’s a fraud. The paper is the hockey stick for the pandemic.

      Like

  6. Please don’t forget to look at the lower western sky after dusk – it’s been 800 years since the last conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn occurred on Saturnalia (Roman celebration).

    Like

  7. Funny that McKinsey & Company comes up as a player – that site NakedCapitalism I’ve linked to (as an interesting barometer of a more informed yet still mainstream demographic) is run by a woman who IIRC was a consultant for that outfit in a past life (“Yves Smith” aka Susan Webber.)

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I have an off topic question for the EMF experts if it’s okay…
    Someone gave me an iMac – quite a generous gift, and fancier than my current old and cheap tech – but I’m a little concerned about the bluetooth connected keyboard. I swear I can almost feel it emanating at me, lol, but might just be a nocebo effect/ hypochondria. Just wondered if anyone has input on that. I’m already bathed in other kinds of wireless I guess, from apt neighbors. I don’t have a router myself, only access internet by phone/ tethering.

    Like

  9. Is there a way to connect a hard-wired keyboard to the iMac? There should be. Even still (if you get a hard-wired keyboard), you would want to go into the settings on the iMac and disable bluetooth, so it is not continually pinging. Do the same for any devices when you are not using bluetooth. FWIW – I do not feel that the “emanating” effect is all in your head. Best to stay away from bluetooth whenever you can.

    Like

    1. Hard-wired keyboard on a PC just slips into a USB. Our 2012 Mac as a few USB’s on it, and I have a plug-in that allows six more USBs through one port. Should be an easy fix.

      I got away from Bluetooth mouses and keyboards years ago, not because of safety concerns, but because they were not responsive enough, and batteries needing change.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s