Deadly cures

“…I think the Catholic Church was too much blamed in the case of Galileo – he was just a victim of peer review.” (Eric J. Lerner, The Big Bang Never Happened, 1991)

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” (Upton Sinclair)

tgphI stumbled on the Lerner quote this morning, and thought it would be a nice way to introduce a subject in need of examination, PSA, or the prostate specific antigen, discovered by Richard Ablin in 1970. It has been his life’s work to inform the public on the true nature of the PSA test. Peer review, or enforced mediocrity, plays a large part in preventing the truth about various forms of quackery from seeing light of day. Ablin’s work against PSA does not stand the withering criticism of his peers, who are in it for the money.  PSA testing, followed by unnecessary biopsies and prostatectomies, is big business. Ablin doesn’t get it.

Albin co-wrote the book, The Great Prostate Hoax: How Big Medicine Hijacked the PSA Test and Caused a Public Health Disaster. Since it was he who discovered PSA, he has a right to speak up. (I fear, however, that in the U.S. the best place to hide something is in a book. )

Before discussing PSA, I was struck by similarities between it and AIDS. Both prostate cancer and immune deficiency are relatively small matters (vitally important to individuals but small in terms of the general population) blown wildly out of proportion. AIDS changed our behavior and forced us to stop trusting one another. I suspect it was somehow connected to population control, but the point is that it was foisted on us deliberately by false experts. These were lying liars telling their disgraceful lies with authority of the medical establishment behind them. “HIV,”  if it exists at all, is a harmless passenger virus. It is still thought to be deadly by the public at large. It can be contained, we are told, by “AZT” – a failed chemotherapy drug from the 1960s that was repurposed, but which is itself deadly.

Behind these three-letter acronyms lurk some seemingly shady characters. In the matter of AIDS, it was Richard Gallo, and with PSA William J. Catalona. Both aggressively push their causes in the face of overwhelming contrary evidence.

More about AIDS down the road, but what confused me is that on this blog we have routinely exposed fake events, very large ones, where in reality no one was harmed. It left me with the impression that the people behind these events were a benign force, not as much evil as merry pranksters. But with AIDS and AZT, healthy people who would otherwise lead normal lives suffer, even die of the treatment. So too with PSA.

Since 2012 or so, doctors have been advised not to test men over age 50 for prostate cancer by use of the PSA test. I am 68. Last year I twice had a PSA test, first in May when it turned up higher than the year before, and again in November, which found it normal. I was never told that the current policy is not to use the PSA test on me.

What if the PSA had not been “normal”? My doctor would have recommended a biopsy of my prostate to test for cancer. If found, I would have endured a prostatectomy, and my life as a man would be over. It is not unusual in the wake of this procedure for men to experience incontinence and impotence. But that is better, we are told, than having prostate cancer, which is deadly.

Prostate cancer is most often benign and best left untreated, but three things need to be understood:

  • If I have an aggressive prostate cancer, I will die from it. They cannot alter that fact. They might give me a few months extra by means of radiation or chemotherapy or a drug regimen known as “Provenge,” themselves a scourge on living organisms, but they cannot change my fate.
  • Aggressive prostate cancer is the exception in men, not the rule. That is why, at my age, they don’t even want me PSA-tested.
  • Prostatectomy is major surgery, and often leaves a man incontinent and impotent. Since it cannot stop an aggressive cancer (a “rabbit”) and is not warranted for a benign one (a “turtle”), it should be done only rarely, perhaps in younger men who have so much more time at stake. Aggressive treatment might then be warranted.

That scare word, “cancer,” is a large part of the reason why doctors can, knowingly or ignorantly, perform this potentially debilitating surgery.  People panic when they hear it – “get it out of me! Cure me!” But our bodies are equipped with immune systems that serve us well for most of our lives. Our immune systems can and do contain cancers of various types.

This brings us to the PSA test itself. Ablin, discoverer of PSA, now campaigns against its use. It doesn’t tell us anything useful, he says. From his book:

“The soft-spoken academician [Hal Arkes, PhD] visually illustrated the results of the data: “Picture two auditoriums, each filled with 1000 men. One auditorium is filled with men who had PSA screening test, and one auditorium is filled with men who had not been tested – eight men in each auditorium will die of prostate cancer. As hard as it is for some people to recognize, these two auditoriums represent the statistical reality of prostate cancer.” (Page 44)

Ablin has what he calls the “four cruxes” of the PSA test:

  1. PSA cannot diagnose prostate cancer.
  2. There is no specific level of PSA that detects prostate cancer.
  3. The PSA test cannot distinguish an indolent cancer from an aggressive cancer.
  4. Prostate cancer is age-related. If a group of asymptomatic men between 60 and 69 years old have PSA-prompted biopsies, more than 65% will be positive for prostate cancer.

The PSA test is meaningless. There is a 65% chance that I currently have prostate cancer. I could have a PSA of 11 and not have cancer, or a PSA of 1.2 and have it. There is an even larger chance that I will die by some other cause.

So what’s going on here? As with AIDS, doctors are harming instead do of helping their patients, violating their oaths. My older brother had an annual physical in 2008 that showed an elevated PSA (4.0 ng/mL is the (arbitrary) standard). So at age 64 he underwent a biopsy that showed he had prostate cancer. Was it aggressive? I do not know, and I don’t think he knew either. He trusted his doctor, who he thought was saving his life. He underwent radical surgery that changed his life.

Steve was a vibrant man who neither smoked nor drank and who was a serious runner (he qualified for and participated in the Boston Marathon). The surgery stopped him in his tracks. In 2011 he died from cancer deep in his intestines, and I long suspected a connection between the prostate surgery and spread of cancer throughout his body. The Ablin book offered no evidence of such a connection. Prostate cancer, when a rabbit, will metastasize to the bone and result in a painful death.

Millions of men have had the PSA test since 1986, when it was first approved by the FDA as a means of monitoring treatment of men known to have aggressive prostate cancer. The test was never meant to be administered to the population as a whole, as it was not shown to be useful screening device in detecting cancer.

So why did Food and Drug Administration sit idly by and do nothing about this massive and illegal off-label use of the test? Ablin is not willing to condemn the whole of the FDA for corruption, so I will do so in his stead. It is because of “regulatory capture,” that is, the power of large corporations to insert their people as foxes guarding the public hen house.

Hundreds of thousands of men have undergone unnecessary and debilitating surgery. Urologists have prospered, as have the manufacturers of elaborate and useless equipment such as two-story high machines that use radiation to destroy the prostate. Add to that the corporations that sell erectile dysfunction equipment and boner pills and adult diapers. It is obscene.

I cannot and do not say that each an every urologist who performs an unnecessary prostatectomy is knowingly harming his patient. We are far too complex and self-deceiving as humans  for such broad-brush statements. That is why I opened above with the Upton Sinclair quote. I can only say that in the upper reaches of large medical corporations that profit from sale of devices and drugs, that there is a intent to deceive the public. It is well understood as one scales the upper reaches of the business world that sociopaths abound.

“While running for president of the United States, the former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani announced in a 2007 campaign advertisement, “I have prostate cancer, five, six years ago. My chance of surviving prostate cancer – and thank God, I was cured of it – in the United States? 82%. By chance of surviving prostate cancer in England? Only 44% under socialized medicine.” (Page 219)

This illustrates two fatal flaws in our health care system – celebrity endorsement, and widespread use of advertising to reach an ignorant public with false messages. Neither should be allowed. Giuliani merely repeated a lie, perhaps knowingly, as I know he has willfully lied about other matters. Regardless of his intent or level of knowledge, his words about prostate cancer are wrong, harmful and dangerous.

Mark Twain’s told us about lies, damned lies, and statistics. Gerd Gigerenzer and Odette Wegwarth of the Max Planck Institute in Berlin published a paper in the British medical Journal, “Five-Year Survival Rates Can Mislead,  dealing with the Giuliani matter. These are Ablin’s words dealing with the paper:

[They explained] that the higher survival rate in United States, publicly advertised by Giuliani, is merely a statistical mirage. The earlier detection of prostate cancer due to routine PSA screening in the United States led to an exaggeratedly elevated survival rate, but the men did not live significantly longer than their counterparts in the United Kingdom. One poignant message was missing from [Gigerenzer and Wegwarth’s] paper: not only did the US men not live longer than the UK man, they suffered immeasurably more unnecessary procedures and treatments because of routine PSA screening. Spearing sacred medical cows, like “early detection leads to cure,” is fraught with peril. (Page 219)

I long ago read that in Europe, prostate cancer was monitored but not aggressively treated.  There was no point as, statistically speaking, men receiving treatment in the U.S. were living no longer than their European counterparts. I think I even knew this at the time that my brother underwent the surgery. But, like him, I did not know to question the doctors. So it is with some embarrassment that I admit that last year I allowed myself to have the PSA test. I just blithely went along.

I regard Ablin’s book as vitally important, even life-saving. It is not often I merely put up a book and say “read it,” as books can be mere propaganda, just like so many other mass media outlets.

“Books are different from all other propaganda media,” wrote chief of the CIA’s Covert Action Staff, “primarily because one single book can significantly change the readers attitude and action to an extent unmatched by the impact of any other single medium [such as to] make the most important weapon of strategic (long-range) propaganda.”

That’s a snippet from the book The Cultural Cold War by Frances Stonor Saunders. She describes how the CIA from its inception boldly inserted itself in every medium from books, magazines, music and art to control our perceptions.

So now we have two books warning us about hazards, and are in need of objective reasoning. Should Ablin be trusted, or is he merely another soldier on a contrived and unstated mission?

In his book, Ablin condemns the widespread abuse of the PSA test, the greed of the urology profession, the indifference to suffering caused by unnecessary medical procedures. My instincts say “trust”, because …

  1. He discovered PSA;
  2. He fought against its use in screening the general population;
  3. He has taken on big medicine, and so is now vilified and pushed to the margins;
  4. His writing makes sense. He (and co-author Richard Piana) worked hard to make complicated subjects understandable, the sign of good-functioning minds.

On September 30, 2010*, [Michael Wilkes, M.D.] published a powerful op-ed piece in the San Francisco Chronicle titled “PSA Tests Can Cause More Harm Than Good,” in which he stated:

“The large majority of PSA discovered “cancers” would never cause any problem whatsoever if they went undetected… Most of the men treated would’ve been just fine if they never knew about the cancer. But when they’re treated (whether with surgery, radiation, chemotherapy), the majority suffers really life affecting effects, such as impotency and/or incontinence.… Contrast this to the comments of PSA discoverer Dr. Richard Aplin, who called it “a hugely expensive public health disaster,” with accuracy “hardly better than a coin toss.”

On the very same day that Wilkes’ op-ed article was published, an executive associate dean wrote a letter to the [University of California at Davis] medical school associate dean for curriculum stating that Wilkes would no longer continue as a doctoring instructor of record and the resources for student exchange program that he had championed would be eliminated. [The] dean was also informed that Wilkes’s “departmental space” would be reassigned. …

In effect, Wilkes, a prominent professor commended by his peers and students for his contributions to academic, was having his career dismantled because he wrote an op-ed piece voicing concern about over-the-top promotion of PSA screening. (Page 183)

(*Link is dated October 1, 2010, an important fact.)

Wilkes eventually won out. None of the threats were carried out, and they had a nice academic freedom food fight at UCD over the matter. The investigating panel concluded that the article was published on October 1st and the email was sent the day before. Ablin cites the article as appearing on September 30th, which is apparently wrong. But … something is fishy here. It seems unlikely that an out-of-the-blue threatening email would be sent to a man unless the man had somehow threatened the institution they both worked for.

I have seen and read about so much of this, in science, medicine … heavy-handed bullying of anyone who speaks up or out. The don’t-rock-the-boat mentality keeps most doctors and scientists in line. The few who do speak out are ostracized, marginalized, pilloried, or even fired and forced to make an honest living. It is a sad state of affairs.

The message from Ablin is important and needs to be spread far and wide – do not trust the PSA test. If your PSA is elevated, it could be due to a bumpy car ride or a romp in the hay the night before. (I suspect that vigorous exercise, like running, might elevate one’s PSA.)

Do not undergo major surgery due to a threat that is probably not a threat. The best treatment for prostate irregularities is intelligent motoring. Allow for a DRE (digital rectal exam), a far less invasive procedure (and one that we all enjoy). If irregularities are noted, monitor your health and watch for other symptoms. It could be just an infection, or it could be a benign cancer best left untreated. Those are far more likley than aggressive cancer.

I speak only for myself: If I learn I have aggressive cancer, my option will be pain management as I leave the scene, nothing more. That is my choice. My advice to you: Be informed. Otherwise, as always, you are on your own. Experts* are not to be trusted.


*Experts offer us … “data and jargon. [They are] a breed of people dedicated to obscurantism and the acquisition of information for its own sake, cloaked with mystique and omnipotence. (Brian J. Ford, The Cult of the Expert, 1982)

37 thoughts on “Deadly cures

  1. Although I think that the Bible is one of the most pernicious books ever invented, I really do like to quote it:
    Running from the SOUND of Fear, they fall into the Pit, rising from the Pit they get caught in the Snare. Fits this scenario perfectly since they have used the same tactics for millennia because… it WORKS! Never mess with a working system. Whisper: PSA and all of a sudden men are having the bloodiest most invasive surgery possible. Whispter: breast cancer and all of a sudden women are having both of their breasts removed PRE-EMPTIVELY because a Yahoodess Starlet said she was going to cut her’s off, but the legend I heard was that she just had reductions. That would be a story to follow up on. The Prostate is the storehouse for Zinc just like the Tonsils are the storehouse for Sulfur, so if you simply gave them the raw materials that they needed they might be able to function. I say: might because we have been so completely damaged that the normal pathways that would have allowed for self correction have also been damaged in that scenario with Sound, Pit and Snare. Kindof a chessgame with three moves planned out in advance.

    the year 2000
    http://clinchem.aaccjnls.org/content/46/10/1610
    “The nature of free, uncomplexed prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the circulation is still unknown. In this study, we developed novel anti-PSA antibodies using PSA produced by a metastasized cancer cell line, LNCaP, as an immunogen.”
    Translation for the not-too-technical:
    There’s this ‘thing’…we don’t know what it is…we don’t know why it’s there…so we made a weapon to get rid of it using cancer to grow our thing that takes out the thing that does a thing that we don’t know what it does.
    Seriously. That is EXACTLY what it said.

    And they discontinued public hangings…. why?….

    Not to worry… it gets worse…

    http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/6/5/1632
    “A recombinant vaccinia virus encoding human prostate-specific antigen (rV-PSA) was administered as three consecutive monthly doses to 33 men with rising PSA levels after radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, both, or metastatic disease at presentation. Dose levels were 2.65 × 106, 2.65 × 107, and 2.65 × 108 plaque forming units. Ten patients who received the highest dose also received 250 μg/m2 granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an immunostimulatory adjunct. No patient experienced any virus-related effects beyond grade I cutaneous toxicity. Pustule formation and/or erythema occurred after the first dose in all 27 men who received≥ 2.65 × 107 plaque forming units.”

    The same year of the millennium we have yet another Sound, Pit, Snare scenario. Translation:

    “We took an organism said to be ‘eradicated’ (an absurd superstition) then GMOed it into a monster that expressed the thing that they didn’t know what it was or what it did in the previous monstrosity so that the victims of this jab would make THEIR OWN ANTIBODIES to the thing that they don’t know what it is or what it does. The GMO bug, which of course BECAUSE IT IS A LIVE VIRUS AND CAN SHED TO THE CIVILIAN POPULATION gave ‘minor’ problems of skin reactions of a LIVE VIRUS which means that they got Serum Sickness and are now carriers of a living weapon. Not to worry, these saps also got GCMAF that supposedly got some high profile alterNOTive doctors killed, but that’s OK because it is being used in the camp of the killers.

    PSA, by the whey, is absolutely ‘normal’ to the proper function of reproduction, however, the whitecoats freak when it is high. That requires some investigation that I personally don’t have time for right now, but the fact that it is a COMPLETELY NORMAL CHEMICAL that was triggered to increase in the PRESENCE of cancer needs to be re-evaluated in the way that I just said it, not the way that it has been presented.

    There are those who religiously vomit that cancer is caused by fungus. Whether or not that is so, Zince is antifungal. The entire Herpesviridae Family of viruses are all ONCOviruses shot into us with the Polio vaccine so there is definitely a viral connection to cancer (unless you don’t BELIEVE in viruses then you don’t have cancer neither) so that is yet another investigation into the role of herpes Family and PSA. Regardless: the PSA was the SOUND of Fear so that all else that followed was a Rube Goldberg of Disaster.

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  2. According to Google Book Search, ‘Transactions of the Minnesota State Medical Association in 1892’ periodical included the following in 1892: “The statements were to the effect that there are three classes of unreliable witnesses, and they were respectively classified as the liar, the _____ liar and the medical expert.”
    A UK soap has had a storyline recently of a young wife with cancer who gave up chemo therapy on the advice of a friend she met in the hospital who subsequently died from catching mumps from a relative’s child who didn’t have the jab on her say so. The scriptwriters killed 2 birds with one stone there and reinforced the mantra – Doctors are always right, do as they say.
    (I had a friend who died a year after having chemo, even though the doctors said they caught the cancer early).

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    1. Thanks for the quote that made me bark like a dog! I forgot in my diatribe to note that the 5-year limit on cancer treatment was invented because the victim typically dies from the chemo after 5 years. That works for them because the person is taken off the statistics so that it does not reflect poorly on their invented lie. My regrets for the loss of your friend.

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    2. I have several close friends that have family members that have been greatly harmed by the MMR vaccine….one has a 9-year-old child with Juvenile Arthritis and the doctors are trying to figure out how a child so young could have it….I knew immediately and pulled up the vaccine insert to send to the family. Another friend has Epididymitis (Mar 8, 2018 – Epididymitis is an inflammation of the small, coiled tube at the back of the testicle (epididymis)) and will probably not be able to father a child….so unnecessary and both caused by the f**king vaccine. Here is the insert…all the adverse reactions are listed but no one thinks to read the damn thing.
      https://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/m/mmr_ii/mmr_ii_pi.pdf

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  3. My old man had his plug pulled at 74(!) and in a later exam from a different doctor, he was told had he been in his mid 9(!!)0’s, maybe the situation would have been worth monitoring, butt surgery was completely unnecessary. Live and learn. He had to sit to piss the last 11 (!!!) years of his life.
    I read somewhere that ass cancer was first discovered in cadavers of men in their late nineties. This “cancer” was never going to be a pandemic sized issue. Like osteoporosis in middle aged women, prostate cancer in men is a marketing ploy.
    I had an operation when I was 6 weeks old because the food wasn’t making it to my stomach. Not a common problem, but that kind of thing was around. Ya gotta eat so that operation actually helped. Mass tonsillectomies were called off a year before I was deemed at risk and would need the procedure. Dodged that bullet. Haven’t been under the knife since. When I’m a cadaver, then they can slice away.
    There was a fad in the 18th-ish century where removing one’s colon was thought to retard aging. Well, no one who had that procedure got old, if you know what I mean.
    Somewhere in the post glasnost east, preventative child appendectomies were all the rage. The things people believe.
    A few years ago, a couple of Hollywood skanks allegedly lopped off their golden bozos to scare women into regular mammograms (which seem like the most painful thing a woman can subject herself to).
    At work, “Human Resources” used to be called “Person-nel”.
    Being a statistic is a life style choice, which means you don’t have to be one.

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    1. My father had prostate cancer that metastasized to the bones. He, at the age of 52, was given 6 months to live but managed to live almost 10 additional years. He refused surgery or chemo and had many good months/years between bouts of illness after the various remissions. Finally, toward the end, he decided on chemo…that was Nov of 1987 and he was dead by May of 1988….62 years old. He had a twin that lived to his early to mid-’80s. Dad worked on The Houston Ship Channel and was exposed to many deadly chemicals, long before it was common knowledge that they were so deadly. So many of his friends and co-workers died early due to the toxic nature of the work environment. Such criminal acts!! My dad was a wonderful, loving father and man.

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      1. That is amazing, Annette, that he lived so long with a “rabbit” cancer. He must be out on the end of the Bell Curve. Must have been a very tough man. I don’t know of you noticed that Ablin says that when the cancer is aggressive, it does metastasize to the bone and is very painful.

        Another brother of mine, Joe and not Steve, was riddled with cancer in his late fifties and was told that he had little time left to live. Still, they wanted to do radiation on him to buy him a few more weeks. He took one treatment and said no more, and good for him. He died a short time later, lost in a morphine haze.

        His doctor, an oncologist, quit the profession not long after Joe died. Steve told me he was burned out from getting emotionally involved with his patients. That could well be, but I also wondered if he was discouraged at not being able to help or heal people.

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        1. I would imagine that an honest, really concerned doctor, would “burn out” from not being able to actually help patients with chemo and radiation…but, unfortunately, those are few and far between. Shortly after my mastectomy, Angelina supposedly (and I highly doubt it) had her breasts lopped off….I received an email from Sutter (my health system) about her “bravery” and asking me to consider having the blood work done to see if I had the “gene”….needless to say, I sent back a very strongly worded email about my recent mastectomy and told them to never contact me again!!

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        2. Have I shared this one before? Hospice nurse humor …

          Q. Why does the undertaker nail the coffin shut?

          A. To keep the oncologist from administering another round of chemo.

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        3. On physician burnout, see this Jennifer Daniels podcast:
          http://vitalitycapsules.com/physician-burnout

          Old show so I can’t remember all the details. One point she has made is that medical schools offer rationalizations when students see that treatments are ineffective. They claim that even if individual patients don’t benefit (or suffer harm), that in the aggregate, statistically there is (allegedly) some marginal benefit to some tiny fraction. So, even if doctors don’t see results with their own eyes, they are supposed to believe that the system as a whole is beneficial…

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  4. Mark if you don’t go to a doctor you will never be told that you’re having cancer and then you never will. If you do and the doctor will feel justified to diagnose cancer, he will, you’ll get scared and the probability is high, you will end with real cancer. A friend of us, working his entire life in an office, not very sporty, got in his 50-s pain in the back, went to a doctor. Doctor diagnosed testicle cancer, friend got castrated, pain in the back did not vanish but the doctor convinced our friend that without the castration it would have been much worse now. That trick works every time. If the treatment does not help, the doctor will tell you it would have been much worse now without it. You’ll never know. I recently read about “broken heart” syndrome (takotsubo cardiomyopathy) which is a real thing. Think of your first love dumping you. All that pain in the heart. Remember? It’s your thoughts which are responsible. It’s all made in your head. The sooner you’ll arrange yourself with it, the faster it will heal.

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  5. OT: I found the recent discussion about the nature of war between Mark and Muller very interesting. Both sides had a plausible argument I feel, so I’m torn between them. Maybe some middle position is the answer? Maybe it works by, as Ab says, having a kernel of truth on which to build the lie, which makes the lie nearly unstoppable if trumpeted by propaganda.

    That is, maybe man does have a capacity for tribal warfare somewhat, or even for being conditioned into a killer soldier in boot camp. Or at least, some men in some circumstances. But, perhaps this kernel of truth is taken as a basis for wild and fantastic war scenarios that never occurred, or were largely stage managed and illusory? A blend of fact and fiction. Hard to say which way the pendulum swings further though.

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    1. what plausible arguments, …wait, what arguments at all did Steve offer? He’s quoting the translation and definition of poverty to me now. That is not an argument. That is silly and polemic. We all grew up with this horror image of the two world wars and all the atrocities. I did believe in it for a long time and had to go backwards and first successfully questioned the recent wars that are told to happen after 911, than there were this wars in the Balkan I did not really believe in from the beginning because I have friends from Croatia and Serbia and they told me different already back then in the 90-s. As for the two world wars, the conditioning is so strong and world wide and it’s like everybody has to learn the same version of it with only slight differences in perspective. It is much more dense than a conventional religion. Every religion in the past was meant only for a certain group of people. There was no world religion until know where everybody believes in “The News”. That gives it away IMO. Knowing this I can easily play along pretending to believe. It does not harm anybody because there is no harm at all. People are not beasts and exceptions are very few. Rational people don’t do such things and irrational people can’t do anything of importance.

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        1. I’ve just had a look at Vexman’s site (in particular the Mȕnich Hoax), and the commentator ‘Another German’ seems Mȕlleresque. May be a German trait, who knows? Tutti i gatti sono grigi nell’oscurità.

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      1. B. Muller, I actually agree with you about the modern wars, or find it plausible that it’s mythology/ propaganda, managed by the tribal “chiefs” behind the scenes.

        But you seemed to say IIRC that our whole image of man’s warlike nature or capacity was wrong. Okay, probably so, but to what extent? In pre modern times, did tribes settle all their disputes through dialogue? Are warrior costumes and weapons purely for display and intimidation, or were they used in actual battle? Is there not a percentage of the population, like some police, that thrive on confrontation and dominance displays? Or many young men filled with hormones who want to prove their manliness? Therefore I also find it plausible that within these stage managed conflicts are some actual skirmishes and battles. Or that boot camp may “work” on some subjects. I don’t know exactly where the line is, but hesitate to draw it at either All fake or All real.

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        1. Boot camp servs two purposes, to brainwash them and compartmentalize rhem. The brainwashing serves to out them in us vs them mode. The compartmentalization keeps them from seeing the big picture. I suggest that they do send them out with guns to do some mayhem, and that they have some done back at them.

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          1. When confronted with the sandfleas of Camp Lejune, I was forced to consider that the insane vaccinations and exposure to parasites (ecto and endo) in these indoctrination centers was a major part of turning their MK creations into Hot Box disease carrying vectors to the corners of the Ea-rth.

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          2. Population control and regular culling of aggressive males should not be overlooked as underlying causes of war. There is more than “some mayhem” within our borders without looking overseas — domestic violence kills thousands annually. Violent behavior is channeled to divide us, but not discouraged per se. War should be looked at beyond bombs and bullets. What has not been weaponized to fight against any possibility of a goy uprising?

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        2. TIMR, been there, done that, so to speak. I also went from doubting the recent wars going backwards and now I’m doubting all the famous and historically “documented” battles and wars. It didn’t happen as we learned it in schools and maybe it didn’t happen at all. As for “young men filled with hormones”, all cultures invented their rituals to bring the youth into adulthood. It usually requires some time spend without parents away from home and taking some responsibility. Battles or wars are something different and not fought because the youth has to much energy to spend. All we know about battles and wars from the past comes from some historical “evidence”, which I don’t trust anymore. Just take a look at how current events become historical evidence for future generations. It is all fake news. Yet still in future children will still have to learn about 19 Muslims who successfully turned two skyscrapers into dust. History is not to be trusted. It doesn’t matter if it is the story of biblical Abraham killing his own son Isaak or the story of Atilla the Hun killing Romans or the 911 story, its all of the same quality. All invented by some writers and used as propaganda by TPTB to control the masses. They keep telling us that we have to learn the history, not to make the same mistake again. Can we learn anything from fake (hi)stories? Yes, I think, we still can. There usually is some moral lesson included in every story, so is in every history. Parents tell fairy tales to their children for the same reason. That is the real purpose of retelling legends. And history is always based on legends.

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          1. B. Muller, I agree the documented history is phony. I’m just saying in line with Mark’s comment, that “a little bit of mayhem” may be part of the theatrical production. It adds to the credibility of the official story, and makes it harder to debunk. Because then things are in a gray area.

            This could work if it plays on real human anthropology, such as man’s tribal nature or terrritoriality. Just as a group of apes may claim a spot of land. And fight with neighboring males of a separate tribe for access to water etc. These kinds of innate qualities could be tapped into and distorted for purposes of giving the overall war narrative a bit of credibility.

            Take Vietnam for example. With the soldiers prepped for “war” and locals resentful of these alien invaders (whatever the behind the scenes planning), there would naturally be actual violent mayhem. No?

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          2. TIMR, there may have been some battles in the past, some tribal fights, or maybe groups of people stealing from others. Things like that seem possible to me but that would never make it into official history. If it is a part of the history, it had to be invented. I’m more and more convinced that all history is not different to today’s news. It is sometimes based on real events and vastly exaggerated, but mostly completely invented.

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  6. There is a difference between “fake” and unreliable sources. Broad statements like that are of little use. The bible contains some good writing, mythology, and e second part is about a man who died at age 33 … Hmmm. Still, a good story.

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    1. I’ve read the Bible, but I never did read that Jesus was 33 in the actual text.
      ‘The exact age of 33 is post-biblically based on medieval numerology, which equated “three” with the Trinity in number symbolism. Dying at age 33 linked Christ twice-over with the Trinity.’ (Vincent Hopper, Medieval Number Symbolism).

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      1. I have not read the bible. It was too dense for me … ahr ahr. I got that backwards. There are parts that are well written and were brougt to my attention by others, Book of Job and Ecclesiastes, for instance. I was raised Catholic and I told that Jesus began his public life at age 30 and died at 33. I never questioned it. But there is that damned number again.

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        1. I didn’t know about the old and new testament when I was a child and churchgoer. The new testament was synonym for the bible and was hardly in possession of the common folks. Only very few had one and of course the priests had always had it. The old testament was a kind of forbidden although I never questioned this back then because I wasn’t interested enough in it. What the common folks had and what was obligatory and what every child got on his communion was the catechism, which is a sort of bible for dummies. I only later learned that there is a old testament and what are its contents. But at the time it was just a collection of some ancient horror stories to me and not worth a second look.

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    2. Ah, that blatant symbol used by the Medical Mafia get a free pass. K. The Harlot Church, has ‘edited’ much of the text (bible) in her favor. In fact that church still tells it subjects in the pews to not read any of it. THEY will tell you what you need to know. I know, I too WAS there once long ago. My gut told me it’s time to walk. And 20 years of research of it & world affairs shows that vatican (means dragon) is a major influence on the minds & times of today. Millions & millions of folk kneeling before wood & statues each week.

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      1. Be nice, now… the Catholic (meaning Universal meaning One World) Church has done so much for man-kind like burning natives at the stake in order to save their souls in the next life and think of the ART! Their stuff rivals anything I have seen come out of the Death Metal album cover genre. Please send me connections of ‘vatican’ to ‘dragon’ because Vlad Tepes II the father of Vlad Tepes III Dra Cul Ah = Son of the Dragon because daddy was a knighted catholic in the Order of the Dragon. I always had a wry smile for a religion with unveiled references to their supposed enemy… and a standing army… God is Love.

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        1. When Atilla the Hun showed up in Rome ready to kill everyone and burn the place to the ground, the citizens of Rome gave him all of their gold and he went away. Rome recovered after a while and kept right on being in charge. When the Vandals showed up in Rome to do the same thing, the Romans offered up their gold and the Vandals took that gold and killed and burned the place to the ground
          anyway. The Vandals enslaved the Romans and made them destroy their own aqueduct and buildings. The temples of virtue were destroyed, the emperor’s palaces were destroyed, and many Romans were executed. Rome ceased to exist after that except as the Catholic church.

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          1. The legends of Rome revolve around Millennial Reign. This is why Arny Schicklegruber gave the ROMAN SALUTE and called his the THIRD REICH = Reign. Meaning the 3rd of 1000 years of rule. If we are generous and call the Romans Yaphetites, so that the other invaders were either their cousins the Shemites or Hammites then the FAMILY DYNASTY really never changed there were just different kids running different avatars at the video game console. To avoid labeling THEIR history based on the Three Stooges of My Three Sons (of Noea) is to be caught in their trialectic where names like Huns and Vandals merely occult the family-on-family violence with the whirled as collateral damage. Rome was never a place or a material infrastructure but a cult of Black Magi with advanced tech that exported their ’empire’ throughout the whirled including Great Britain so to say that ‘rome’ is no more ignores the entire history of England and its Mad German Kings, it’s own Roman Invasion and all that comes with this shuffling of children at the joysticks of a mortal combat game that should never been allowed to be plugged in. Yes, Christianity is the Yaphetite version of the Shemite Yudaism and the Hammite Yslam. It is what I call: Same Pig – Different Lipstick.

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  7. Rome is built upon the ruins of another city. Saturn. That is as black arts as you can get. Behold the attire for most employed by Her is black, especially JESUIT. For the record I have had an uncle & aunt in this serving satan errr.. umm.. Rome as a priest & nun.

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